9 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before Feb. 4

  • MONDAY, JANUARY 30

    Talk and Screening: “An Evening With Andrea Fraser” at MoMA
    Andrea Fraser–whose work has included a videotaped sexual liaison with a collector and an impersonation of an alc0hol-fueled speech by artist Martin Kippenberger, and who has been tapped for this year’s Whitney Biennial–will discuss her work and screen a few videos of her performances. –Andrew Russeth
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 7 p.m., $12

    TUESDAY, JANUARY 31

    Screening: Yvonne Rainer’s Kristina Talking Pictures at 155 Freeman
    Choreographer Yvonne Rainer’s 1976 film follows a “European woman lion-tamer [who] comes to America and takes up choreography.” Writes Ms. Rainer, “In the next-to-last shot a love letter is recited. So you see, things aren’t all that bad.” Seating is first come, first served, so arrive early. –A.R.
    Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn, 7 p.m., $7

    WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1

    Reading: Susanne Kippenberger at 192 Books
    The sister of the late, great Kippenberger will discuss the biography of her brother she penned, Martin Kippenberger: The Artist and His Families, the result of extensive interviews with his friends and associates, which has just been translated into English. Here’s hoping we get some stories about the famously irrepressible artist. –A.R.
    192 Books, 10th Avenue, New York, 7 p.m.

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2

    Opening: Jon Kessler, “The Blue Period,” at Salon 94

    First installed in Berlin in 2007, Mr. Kessler’s broad-reaching work about surveillance and loneliness makes its U.S. debut. –Michael H. Miller
    Salon 94, 243 Bowery, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Performance: Neal Medlyn’s Wicked Clown Love at the Kitchen
    Did that extensive n+1 juggalo reportage leave you thirsty for more? Be sure to catch performance artist Neal Medlyn’s new show at The Kitchen this week. To quote the press release: “The show will revolve around Medlyn’s dark specter versions of ICP songs, male bonding activities, flashlight wrestling, terror and horror, face paint, underground Midwestern horror rap, Faygo showers, clown love, and much more. ‘Fuckin all out buck wild behavior is to be expected,’ Medlyn says.” You had us at “flashlight wrestling.” –Dan Duray
    The Kitchen, 512 West 19 Street, New York, 8 p.m., through Saturday,
    $15

    Opening: “Drawing a Line in the Sand” at Peter Blum SoHo
    Peter Blum explores a collection of works on paper by a wide range of artists including David Rabinowitch, John Beech, John Zurier, Léonie Guyer , Louise Bourgeois, Mireille Gros, N. Dash, Robert Ryman, Robert Zandvliet, Simon Frost, Sol LeWitt and Zipora Fried. — M.H.M.
    Peter Blum SoHo, 99 Wooster Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3

    Opening: Robert Grosvenor at Paula Cooper
    Details remain scant about this show, but Mr. Grovesnor never lets you down. If you still need convincing, swing by the Whitney and take a look at his Tenerife (1966), an impressive knifelike sculpture that slices down from the ceiling and dominates its single room. It’s like if the Minimalists had had a space program. Can’t miss! –D.D.
    534 West 21 Street, New York 6-8 p.m.

    Screening: “No Wave Cinema: The New Elder Statesmen” at MAD
    The Museum of Arts and Design will screen this documentary about the no-wave film movement ahead of a film series that will feature selections from that scene. The most fun you can have in Columbus Circle (that doesn’t involve watching tourists molest those two big Botero statues in the Time Warner Center)! — D.D.
    Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle, New York, $10, 7 p.m.

    Tour: “Infinite Jest: Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to Levine” at the Met
    Walk through the Met’s comprehensive exhibition of caricature—which takes its name from the grave digger scene near the end of Hamlet—with co-curators Nadine M. Orenstein and Constance C. McPhee. — M.H.M.
    Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York 4 p.m., $25

  • Andrea Fraser--whose work has included a videotaped sexual liaison with a collector and an impersonation of an alc0hol-fueled speech by artist Martin Kippenberger, and who has been tapped for this year's Whitney Biennial--will discuss her work and screen a few videos of her performances. --Andrew Russeth
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 7 p.m., $12

  • Choreographer Yvonne Rainer's 1976 film follows a "European woman lion-tamer [who] comes to America and takes up choreography." Writes Ms. Rainer, "In the next-to-last shot a love letter is recited. So you see, things aren't all that bad." Seating is first come, first served, so arrive early. --A.R.
    Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn, 7 p.m., $7

  • The sister of the late, great Kippenberger will discuss the biography of her brother she penned, Martin Kippenberger: The Artist and His Families, the result of extensive interviews with his friends and associates, which has just been translated into English. Here's hoping we get some stories about the famously irrepressible artist. --A.R.
    192 Books, 10th Avenue, New York, 7 p.m.

  • First installed in Berlin in 2007, Mr. Kessler’s broad-reaching work about surveillance and loneliness makes its U.S. debut. --Michael H. Miller
    Salon 94, 243 Bowery, New York, 6-8 p.m., free

  • Peter Blum explores a collection of works on paper by a wide range of artists including David Rabinowitch, John Beech, John Zurier, Léonie Guyer , Louise Bourgeois, Mireille Gros, N. Dash, Robert Ryman, Robert Zandvliet, Simon Frost, Sol LeWitt and Zipora Fried. --M.H.M.
    Peter Blum SoHo, 99 Wooster Street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Details remain scant about this show, but Mr. Grovesnor never lets you down. If you still need convincing, swing by the Whitney and take a look at his Tenerife (1966), an impressive knifelike sculpture that slices down from the ceiling and dominates its single room. It's like if the Minimalists had had a space program. Can't miss! --D.D.
    534 West 21 Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • The Museum of Arts and Design will screen this documentary about the no-wave film movement ahead of a film series that will feature selections from that scene. The most fun you can have in Columbus Circle (that doesn't involve watching tourists molest those two big Botero statues in the Time Warner Center)! --D.D.
    Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle, New York, $10, 7 p.m.

  • Walk through the Met’s comprehensive exhibition of caricature—which takes its name from the grave digger scene near the end of Hamlet—with co-curators Nadine M. Orenstein and Constance C. McPhee. --M.H.M.
    Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York 4 p.m., $25

Galleristny.com is now bigger, and part of Observer.com. We’re bringing you more arts news, as well as culture, design, style, real estate and politics.