11 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before Feb. 27

  • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20

    Screening: Without Gorky at MoMA
    In this 2011 documentary, Cosima Spender investigates the life of her grandfather, the mid-century abstract painter Arshile Gorky, whose work bridged Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, and whose life was marked by tragedies. Ms. Spender will discuss the film after the 79-minute screening. —Andrew Russeth
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 4 p.m.

    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21

    Screening: Women Without Men at CUNY Center for the Humanities
    CUNY Center for the Humanities will screen Shirin Neshat’s 2009 film Women Without Men, based on the 1989 novella by Shahrnush Parsipur. A discussion between the artist and writer will follow.—Michael H. Miller
    CUNY Center for the Humanities, 365 Fifth Avenue Room 5103, 6 p.m.

    WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 22

    Opening: Antoine Catala, “I See Catastrophes Ahead” at 47 Canal
    According to the gallery, Mr. Catala’s first exhibition at 47 Canal, the bleakly titled “I See Catastrophes Ahead,” is about “the in-between stage, when words, images and the material world unite. A metamorphosis, operated by humans with the help of machines.” The show runs until March 25. —M.H.M.
    47 Canal, 6-8 p.m., free

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23

    Event: “The Art Fag City Rob Pruitt Art Awards and Auction” at Site/109
    Who made best use of their genitals this year? Who is the art world’s best Jerry (apart from Mr. Saltz himself, that is)? And, who is the most powerful person in the art world, by bench press? These and other niggling questions will be answered at “The Art Fag City Rob Pruitt Art Awards and Auction,” an event that announces itself as “still not affiliated with Rob Pruitt,” though it embodies the spirit of the artist and auctions off one of his pieces (along with works by Debbie Harry, John Baldessari, Marilyn Minter and the Bruce High Quality Foundation). And while this shindig costs $100, artists get in for $50! —Rozalia Jovanovic
    Site/109, 109 Norfolk Street, New York, 6:30–10 p.m.

    Opening: Ellen Harvey, “The Nudist Museum Gift Shop,” at Dodge Gallery
    Whitney Biennial 2008 artist Ellen Harvey brings her museum critique to her first show with Lower East Side up-and-comer Dodge Gallery with new works that recreate instances of nudity in great works, without any of the nonsense surrounding the nudity. —Dan Duray
    Dodge Gallery, 15 Rivington Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: Jonas Mekas and Robert Polidori, “Portraits” at Edwynn Houk Gallery
    Avant-garde film don Jonas Mekas and photographer Robert Polidori, friends since the latter worked for the former, present their never-before-seen portraits to the public: Mr. Mekas and Dalì; John and Yoko at John’s 32nd birthday; and Edie Sedgwick and Lou Reed at the Velvet Underground’s first performance at the Delmonico Hotel. —D.D.
    Edwynn Houk Gallery, 745 Fifth Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: Thomas Schütte, “New Work,” at Peter Freeman, Inc.
    SoHo gallerist Peter Freeman will toast the opening of his new ground floor space with work by German artist Thomas Schütte, who will offer up a trove of new sculptures, including “two ten-foot-tall wood soldiers stand[ing] facing each other,” and large woodblock prints. Over in Mr. Freeman’s old space, the artist will have watercolors and ceramics on display. —A.R.
    Peter Freeman, Inc., 140 Grand Street and 560 Broadway, Suite 602/603, New York, 6–8 p.m.

    FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24

    Opening Reception: PS3* Pedro Sanchez 3, “On the Outer Edge” at Abrons Arts Center
    Based on Brazilian favelas and constructed from found materials from the Lower East Side, Spanish-born New York-based artist Pedro Sanchez 3 (aka PS3*) exhibits a full-scale home within which he presents new video work. His model home, designed for a life of “deliberate deprivation,” presents the contemporary dwelling space as a response to the desire for affordable housing and a need for a smaller carbon footprint, and falls in line within a movement steadily gaining ground, which has been known to favor an “aesthetics of decline” that trades up bling for blight. —R.J.
    Abrons Arts Center, 466 Grand Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: Paul Graham, “The Present,” at the Pace Gallery
    For his first solo show since joining Pace in 2011, Paul Graham presents a series of photographs of scenes in and about New York City. Exhibited as diptychs, these nearly life-sized images create an immersive environment. The show, the artist’s first in the U.S. since 2009, follows a recent survey of the artist’s work at Whitechapel in London. —R.J.
    The Pace Gallery, 545 West 22nd Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: “John Chamberlain: Choices” at the Guggenheim
    This Susan Davidson-helmed retrospective, planned before the artist’s death late last year, brings together about 100 sculptures from across his career. It should be nice and refreshing to see such generally extroverted work in the ramp’s galleries, which were bare during Maurizio Cattelan’s retrospective. —A.R.
    Guggenheim, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York, 10 a.m.–5:45 p.m.

    SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26

    Opening: “Cindy Sherman” at MoMA
    Posing as clowns, aging socialites and milkmaids from Old Master paintings, Cindy Sherman’s explorations into identity have captured our imagination since the 1970s. This retrospective at MoMA brings together over 170 of Sherman’s images from throughout her career in one of the most anticipated exhibitions of the season.R.J.
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 10:00 a.m.-5:30p.m.

  • In this 2011 documentary, Cosima Spender investigates the life of her grandfather, the mid-century abstract painter Arshile Gorky, whose work bridged Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, and whose life was marked by tragedies. Ms. Spender will discuss the film after the 79-minute screening. —Andrew Russeth
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 4 p.m.

  • CUNY Center for the Humanities will screen Shirin Neshat’s 2009 film Women Without Men, based on the 1989 novella by Shahrnush Parsipur. A discussion between the artist and writer will follow.—Michael H. Miller
    CUNY Center for the Humanities, 365 Fifth Avenue Room 5103, 6 p.m., free.

  • According to the gallery, Mr. Catala’s first exhibition at 47 Canal, the bleakly titled “I See Catastrophes Ahead,” is about “the in-between stage, when words, images and the material world unite. A metamorphosis, operated by humans with the help of machines.” The show runs until March 25. —M.H.M.
    47 Canal, 6-8 p.m.

  • SoHo gallerist Peter Freeman will toast the opening of his new ground floor space with work by German artist Thomas Schütte, who will offer up a trove of new sculptures, including “two ten-foot-tall wood soldiers stand[ing] facing each other,” and large woodblock prints. Over in Mr. Freeman’s old space, the artist will have watercolors and ceramics on display. —A.R.
    Peter Freeman, Inc., 140 Grand Street and 560 Broadway, Suite 602/603, New York, 6–8 p.m.

  • Avant garde film don Jonas Mekas and photographer Robert Polidori, friends since the latter once worked for the former, present their never-before-seen portraits to the public. Mr. Mekas and Dali. John and Yoko at John's 32nd birthday, Edie Sedgwick and Lou Reed at the first performance of the Velvet Underground at the Delmonico Hotel. — Dan Duray
    Edwynn Houk Gallery, 745 Fifth Avenue, at w 57 street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Whitney Biennial 2008 artist Ellen Harvey brings her museum critique in her first show with LES up-and-comer Dodge Gallery with new works that recreate instances of nudity in great works, without any of the nonsense surrounding the nudity. — D.D.
    Dodge Gallery, 15 Rivington Street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Who made best use of their genitals this year? Who is the art world’s best Jerry (apart from Mr. Saltz himself, that is)? And, who is the most powerful person in the art world, by bench press? These and other niggling questions will be answered at “The Art Fag City Rob Pruitt Art Awards and Auction,” an event that announces itself as “still not affiliated with Rob Pruitt,” though it embodies the spirit of the artist and auctions off one of his pieces (along with works by Debbie Harry, John Baldessari, Marilyn Minter and the Bruce High Quality Foundation). And while this shindig costs $100, artists get in for $50! —Rozalia Jovanovic
    Site/109, 109 Norfolk Street, New York, 6:30–10 p.m.

  • For his first solo show since joining Pace in 2011, Paul Graham presents a series of photographs of scenes in and about New York City. Exhibited as diptychs, these nearly life-sized images create an immersive environment. The show, the artist’s first in the U.S. since 2009, follows a recent survey of the artist’s work at Whitechapel in London. —R.J.
    The Pace Gallery, 545 West 22nd Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • Based on Brazilian favelas and constructed from found materials from the Lower East Side, Spanish-born New York-based artist Pedro Sanchez 3 (aka PS3*) exhibits a full-scale home within which he presents new video work. His model home, designed for a life of “deliberate deprivation,” presents the contemporary dwelling space as a response to the desire for affordable housing and a need for a smaller carbon footprint, and falls in line within a movement steadily gaining ground, which has been known to favor an “aesthetics of decline” that trades up bling for blight. —R.J.
    Abrons Arts Center, 466 Grand Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • This Susan Davidson-helmed retrospective, planned before the artist’s death late last year, brings together about 100 sculptures from across his career. It should be nice and refreshing to see such generally extroverted work in the ramp’s galleries, which were bare during Maurizio Cattelan’s retrospective. —A.R.
    Guggenheim, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York, 10 a.m.–5:45 p.m.

  • Posing as clowns, aging socialites and milkmaids from old master paintings, Cindy Sherman’s explorations into identity have captured our imagination since the 1970s. This retrospective at MoMA brings together over 170 of Sherman’s images from throughout her career in one of the most anticipated exhibitions of the spring season. — R.J.
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 10:00 a.m.-5:30p.m.

Comments

  1. George W. Bush says:

    A 12th thing to do: THURSDAY, February 23

    Lecture: Bruce Gagnier on his own work

    Bruce Gagnier is a figure sculptor who shows at Lori Bookstein Fine Art and has taught at the NY Studio School for more than 30 years. Gagnier says he’s not really interested in sculpture–in what sculpture is, etc.–he just likes making figures: drawing, painting, sculpting figures. Gagnier can be very, very funny–and he knows a thing or two about art–but this is probably the least anticipated thing/event of the season.

  2. George W. Bush says:

    Gagnier’s lecture is at the New York Academy of Art, 111 Franklin Street, Tribeca, at 6:30, Thursday. (212-966-0300)

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