Primary Information Adds Storied Conceptual Art Catalogues to Online Siegelaub Archive

xerox book Primary Information Adds Storied Conceptual Art Catalogues to Online Siegelaub Archive

A page from "Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, Lawrence Weiner," also known as the "Xerox Book," edited by Seth Siegelaub, Dec. 1968. (Primary Information)

The New York-based imprint Primary Information just posted online a series of seminal publications of conceptual art put out by curator, dealer and textile maven Seth Siegelaub in the 1960s and early ’70s, including some that doubled as exhibitions. It’s a treasure trove of some of the era’s vanguard art.

In the March 1969 book, Mr. Siegelaub invited 31 artists to produce a work for a given day of the month and share “any relevant information regarding the nature of the ‘work’ you intend to contribute.” Each artist got a page. Claes Oldenburg’s read: “Things Colored Red.” Lawrence Weiner’s: “An object tossed from one country to another.” Ian Wilson’s: “Ian Wilson.” Some didn’t respond at all, and their page was left blank.

Also among the material is Mr. Siegelaub’s January 5-31, 1969 catalogue, which includes documentation of pieces by Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, and others, as well as Huebler’s famous artist statement: “The world is full of objects, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more.”

Those looking for more on Huebler can attend Paula Cooper’s first exhibition with his estate, which opened on Saturday. Fans of Mr. Siegelaub can consult this month’s Artforum for a great interview Lauren O’Neill-Butler conducted with him about his work researching textiles, which he has devoted himself to over the past four decades.

In the interview, Mr. Siegelaub says that he never got to spend much time with his art collection-“most of which I barely ever saw since it was traveling so much.” (He recently donated much of it to the Museum of Modern Art.) Now anyone who visits Primary Information’s site can take a peek at his work.