Morning Read: Obama’s Early Stumbles; Liu Cut Out; Room 9 Returns

Albany police raided a spa belonging to the wife of Bob Port, the investigations editor of the Albany Times Union, claiming it was front for prostitution. Port says the allegation is untrue, and the raid was retaliation for critical coverage from the newspaper.

Andrew Cuomo vowed at a State Committee meeting to elect Democrats at every office in the state, but afterward brushed off questions about politics: “We had a political speech; I’m now stopping the political speech and we’re going to talk about government.”

The Charlie Rangel/Adriano Espaillat has become a war of endorsements.

Room 9, the “longest-serving City Hall bureau in American journalism” is back and open for business.

John Liu was left off the guest list at the Democratic National Convention. 

Mayor Bloomberg slammedTimes editorial yesterday that suggested that NYC follow Philly’s lead and ease off stop-and-frisks.

NYCLU chief Donna Lieberman slammed Ray Kelly for saying that stop-and-frisk decreased the murder rate. 

Christine Quinn’s office blacked out 600 hours of her public schedule in response to a FOIA request.

Chuck Schumer out-foxed Rand Paul to pass a ban on synthetic pot.

Mike Bloomberg said that ending the finger-printing of food-stamp recipients will force the city to do more fraud investigations. 

Bloomberg also got behind a taxi fare increase.

Chris Christie said that the NYPD did not violate the law when they engaged in surveillance of Muslims there. 

A top prosecutor in the Brooklyn DA’s office resigned when it was revealed that she withheld evidence in controversial rape case involving two Crown Heights men and an Orthodox Jewish young woman.

POLITICO says that Obama is stumbling out of the gate. 

The Obama campaign thinks they have a good chance of winning the military vote.

Both parties in Washington are anxious to pass their version of an extension of the Bush tax cuts. 

Is the conservative establishment crumbling?

Obama’s support for gay marriage has led to higher approval ratings for the practice among African-Americans.