8 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before June 10

  • TUESDAY, JUNE 5

    Discussion: Whitney Biennial Curators in Conversation with Michelle Kuo at Artists Space Books & Talks
    The Whitney Biennial is just about over—the final festivities occur on Sunday, June 10, the same day that the last of its galleries close for de-installation. The biennial’s co-curators, Jay Sanders and Elisabeth Sussman, and its film program co-curators, Thomas Beard and Ed Halter, will join Artforum‘s editor in chief, Michelle Kuo, to discuss the exhibition and the critical response it received. This is first come, first served, so it may be wise to arrive a bit early.
    Artists Space Books & Talks, 55 Walker Street, New York, 7 p.m., $5 donation

    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6

    Party: The Whitney Art Party
    The Whitney’s annual Art Party is set to pop this year, with a swanky venue in Soho, music by Japanster and a collaboration between Kreemart and Kalup Linzy that is sure to be bonkers. —Dan Duray
    Skylight Soho, 275 Hudson Street at Spring Street, New York, 9 p.m.–1 a.m., $350

    THURSDAY

    Opening: “Andrepolis,” at The Hole
    This week, the Hole presents “Andrepolis,” an “all encompassing representation of the art culture” at the center of which is Andre Saraiva, street artist and nightclub impresario and owner of the global nightclub Le Baron. If it’s anything like his exhibition earlier this year, at Half Gallery, you can expect a scene as packed and attitudy as you’d see at any of his clubs. —Rozalia Jovanovic
    The Hole, 312 Bowery, New York, 6-9 p.m.

    Opening: “Young Curators, New Ideas IV,” at Meulensteen
    For the fourth, and most ambitious, installment of “Young Curators, New Ideas,” 12 curators present work from 29 artists across 7,000 square feet of space on two floors. This group exhibition, organized by Mr. and Mrs. Amani Olu—Mr. Olu, you’ll recall recently departed from Nadine Johnson to start a gallery—will kick off with music by Derrick Adams and DJ Impostor. The “Young Curators, New Ideas” is an annual show that aims to re-imagine established mediums, materials and concepts, and investigate how contemporary issues are resolved (or not) in an art context. —R.J.
    511 West 22nd Street, New York, 6–9 p.m.

    FRIDAY, JUNE 8

    Extended Hours: “Summer Night” at the Frick
    This sounds pretty much like heaven on Earth: free admission to the Frick on a Friday night for a full three hours after it typically closes. Stroll through the museum’s shows devoted to Renaissance sculptor Antico and Saxon jeweler Johann Christian Neuber, and see how the museum’s new portico gallery fares as the sun sets on the Upper East Side. Alex Katz once quipped, “If we only wanted to look at masterpieces, we’d spend all our time at the Frick.” This can be your masterpiece night.
    The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street, New York, 6–9 p.m.

    Book Launch: Joy Drury Cox, The Old Man and Sea, at Dashwood Books
    The artist Joy Drury Cox holds a book signing and release party for her new project The Old Man and the Sea at Dashwood Books. The book creates original drawings from the periods in an old copy of the book and was printed by the very hip Conveyor magazine. —D.D.
    Dashwood Books, 33 Bond street, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: Megan Whitmarsh “Revolution is a Circle” at Jack Hanley
    Jack Hanley Gallery presents a solo show of work by Los Angeles-based artist Megan Whitmarsh, who uses hand-stitching and embroidery to create large fabric collages. The “revolution” of the title refers as much to the idea of rotation as it does to the other kind of revolution (i.e. the one that won’t be televised…). —Michael H. Miller
    Jack Hanley Gallery, 136 Watts Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    SATURDAY, JUNE 9

    Talk: Fionn Meade on Joseph Beuys at the Dia Art Foundation
    Fionn Meade, a writer and former curator at SculptureCenter (among other places), will discuss the work of Joseph Beuys. But really: what better way to spend a Saturday afternoon then upstate at Dia’s Beacon location? –M.H.M
    Dia: Beacon, 3 Beekman Street, Beacon, 2 p.m., free with museum admission, RSVP here

  • The Whitney Biennial is just about over—the final festivities occur on Sunday, June 10, the same day that the last of its galleries close for de-installation. The biennial's co-curators, Jay Sanders and Elisabeth Sussman, and its film program co-curators, Thomas Beard and Ed Halter, will join Artforum's editor in chief, Michelle Kuo, to discuss the exhibition and the critical response it received. This is first come, first served, so it may be wise to arrive a bit early.

    Artists Space Books & Talks, 55 Walker Street, New York, 7 p.m., $5 donation

    Courtesy Francis Wu/Flickr

  • The Whitney's annual Art Party is set to pop this year, with a swanky venue in Soho, music by Japanster and a collaboration between Kreemart and Kalup Linzy that is sure to be bonkers. —Dan Duray

    Skylight Soho, 275 Hudson Street at Spring Street, New York, 9 p.m.–1 a.m., $350


    Photo: A Lutz Bacher photo from the party's auction

  • This week, the Hole presents “Andrepolis,” an “all encompassing representation of the art culture” at the center of which is Andre Saraiva, street artist and nightclub impresario and owner of the global nightclub Le Baron. If it’s anything like his exhibition earlier this year, at Half Gallery, you can expect a scene as packed and attitudy as you’d see at any of his clubs. —Rozalia Jovanovic
    The Hole, 312 Bowery, New York, 6-9 p.m.

  • For the fourth, and most ambitious, installment of “Young Curators, New Ideas,” 12 curators present work from 29 artists across 7,000 square feet of space on two floors. This group exhibition, organized by Mr. and Mrs. Amani Olu—Mr. Olu, you’ll recall recently departed from Nadine Johnson to start a gallery—will kick off with music by Derrick Adams and DJ Impostor. The “Young Curators, New Ideas” is an annual show that aims to re-imagine established mediums, materials and concepts, and investigate how contemporary issues are resolved (or not) in an art context. —R.J.

    511 West 22nd Street, New York, 6–9 p.m.

  • This sounds pretty much like heaven on Earth: free admission to the Frick on a Friday night for a full three hours after it typically closes. Stroll through the museum's shows devoted to Renaissance sculptor Antico and Saxon jeweler Johann Christian Neuber, and see how the museum's new portico gallery fares as the sun sets on the Upper East Side. Alex Katz once quipped, "If we only wanted to look at masterpieces, we'd spend all our time at the Frick." This can be your masterpiece night.

    The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street, New York, 6–9 p.m.

    Courtesy Wally Gobetz/Flickr

  • The artist Joy Drury Cox holds a book signing and release party for her new project The Old Man and the Sea at Dashwood Books. The book creates original drawings from the periods in an old copy of the book and was printed by the very hip Conveyor magazine. —D.D.
    Dashwood Books, 33 Bond street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Jack Hanley Gallery presents a solo show of work by Los Angeles-based artist Megan Whitmarsh, who uses hand-stitching and embroidery to create large fabric collages. The "revolution" of the title refers as much to the idea of rotation as it does to the other kind of revolution (i.e. the one that won't be televised...). —Michael H. Miller

    Jack Hanley Gallery, 136 Watts Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • Fionn Meade, a writer and curator at SculptureCenter (among other places), will discuss the work of Joseph Beuys. But really: what better way to spend a Saturday afternoon then upstate at Dia's Beacon location? --M.H.M

    Dia: Beacon, 3 Beekman Street, Beacon, 2 p.m., free with museum admission