8 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before June 18

  • Art Basel opens this week, so a good percentage of the New York art world is in Switzerland, but there’s still plenty to do in our city. Below, a brief guide to the week.

    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

    Discussion: “When Cancellations Become Form,” at the Center for Book Arts
    As part of her exhibition at CBA, “Canceled: Alternative Manifestations and Productive Failures,” curator Lauren van Haaften-Schick joins with artist-lawyer Sérgio Muñoz Sarmiento, who attended law school as an artwork, to discuss recent collisions of art and law, like Mass MoCA v. Büchel and Steinkamp v. Rhona Hoffman. (Fans of Dan Duray’s recent article on Prince v. Cariou, which featured Mr. Muñoz Sarmiento, may be especially interested.) —Andrew Russeth
    Center for Book Arts, 28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor, New York, 6:30 p.m., $10 suggested donation

    Lecture: Eleonora Luciano, “Antico in Mantua: Friends and Foes,” at the Frick Collection
    Eleonora Luciano, co-curator of the Frick’s current Antico exhibition, will talk about the sculptor’s artistic circle, notably the presence of Andrea Mantegna. –Michael H. Miller
    The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street, New York, 6–7 p.m.

    THURSDAY, JUNE 14

    Opening: “Musique Plastique,” at Agnès B. Gallery Boutique
    Jean François Sanz curates a group show of artists and musicians that sounds like a Fort Thunder redux for the high-fashion crowd. The artists include David Shrigley, Hisham Bharoocha, Thurston Moore, Daniel Johnston, Alan Vega, Ben Vida, Brian DeGraw, Etienne Charry, Jonas Mekas, Liz Wendelbo and Tobias Bernstrup. —Rozalia Jovanovic
    Agnes b. Gallery New York, 50 Howard Street, New York, 6-9 p.m.

    FRIDAY, JUNE 15

    Opening: Luther Price at Callicoon
    The experimental filmmmaker, fresh from the Whitney Biennial, offers “projections of handmade slides and a selection of ink on wax paper paintings, some of the materials associated with Price’s practice, ongoing since the 1980s, as an artist and filmmaker.” Great gallery, cool artist. Go already! —Dan Duray
    Callicoon Fine Arts, 124 Forsyth Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

    Screening: Santiago Sierra, “No, Global Tour,” at Team Gallery
    Beginning on June 15, No, Global Tour, the feature-length film by artist Santiago Sierra, will have a special evening screening each Friday. Mr. Sierra commissioned the sculptural construction of the word “NO” and then took the 6-foot-tall, 14-foot wide work on a worldwide tour across Western Europe, the U.S. and Japan. This kind of reminds us of when Horst Wackerbath photographed his red couch as it toured the U.S. and the world, getting very personal portraits of the people and locations visited. Or, more recently, like Michael Heizer’s traveling boulder—Mr. Sierra’s “NO” becomes a film star as its journey is chronicled. While this exhibition opened June 7 with screenings at 10:15 a.m., 1 p.m., and 4 p.m., Friday is the only day for that special 7 p.m. slot. —R.J.
    Team Gallery, 83 Grand Street, New York, 7 p.m.

    SATURDAY, JUNE 16

    Performance: Josiah McElheny at Andrea Rosen Gallery
    As part of Mr. McElheny’s third exhibition at Andrea Rosen, “Some thoughts about the abstract body,” the artist will perform using his sculptural assemblages as props. The work explores the relation between clothing and abstraction through the use of historical examples of fashion and costume design. –M.H.M.
    Andrea Rosen Gallery, 525 West 24th Street, New York, 2 p.m., 4 p.m. and 5 p.m.

    SUNDAY, JUNE 17

    Lecture: Jorg Heiser at MoMA PS1
    The Berlin-based Frieze magazine co-editor heads to MoMA PS1 to discuss his book All of a Sudden: Things that Matter in Contemporary Art, part of the museum’s “A Short Course on Resistance” lecture series. —D.D.
    MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens, 3–4 p.m.

    Opening: Gina Beavers at James Fuentes
    Ms. Beavers will present her “Body Works”—painted nude bodies that she has culled from Internet images and rendered in luscious, disturbing, meaty relief. For instance, a lithe woman covered in a faux-Mondrian design and—why not?—posed in front of a red curtain with a gold frame slung around her body. Breasts, bellies protrude; any standard notion of taste is pretty much defenestrated. Daring stuff. —A.R.
    James Fuentes, 55 Delancey Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.