Governor Cuomo Endorses Charlie, Nydia and Hakeem

145780040 Governor Cuomo Endorses Charlie, Nydia and Hakeem

(Photo: Getty)

It’s late in the game with Election Day next Tuesday, but Governor Andrew Cuomo has finally signaled which Democrats he prefers in key primaries around the city. In two races where incumbents are facing serious challenges, Mr. Cuomo has favored the incumbent, while in the open seat competition to replace Rep. Ed Towns, he went with Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries over Councilman Charles Barron.

“I think he is best suited not just for the district for this state,” Mr. Cuomo told Capital Tonight to explain his endorsement of Congressman Charlie Rangel, first reported by the New York Post. “His seniority is a major asset for this state.”

“Nydia is one of New York’s strongest advocates in Washington and she has proven time and again that she gets things done,” the governor said about his backing of Rep. Nydia Velázquez is a press release sent out by her campaign earlier this afternoon. “Whether it is bringing much needed federal dollars for public housing, education and our green spaces or leading the charge to pass the Dream Act in the House, she can always be counted on to deliver results.”

“Hakeem is an inspiring legislator who transcends individual communities and represents the best of a new generation of Democratic leadership,” Mr. Cuomo said in a statement obtained by the New York Daily News. “Hakeem’s priority is always to improve the lives of the people in his district and I look forward to the dynamic energy he is sure to bring to Washington.”

None of these endorsements are especially surprising — it would be far more unusual for a sitting governor to endorse a challenger and the political establishment has rallied behind Mr. Jeffries — but they represent a welcome news hit for each of the campaigns involved.

And, while the timing could have been more convenient so his image could be used in campaign literature and the like, Mr. Cuomo had vowed to wait for the legislative session to end before entering the world of political endorsements, which it did yesterday.