Schneiderman Says ‘Thanks, But No Thanks’ to Romney

eric schneiderman getty2 Schneiderman Says Thanks, But No Thanks to Romney

(Photo: Getty)

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman introduced former President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama in New York last night, and he made a passionate case for the need to defeat the “Romney/Republican agenda” and why the American electorate will say, “Thanks, but no thanks” to a de facto third term for George W. Bush.

“We will continue and build upon the progress President Obama has made,” Mr. Schneiderman argued. “We will show the American people that when there is a Democrat in the White House, a strong and fair economy is possible. It’s possible because we’ve done it, and we’ll do it again.”

In turn, both Mr. Clinton and Mr. Obama heaped praise on Mr. Schneiderman as well.

“First of all, you’ve got an outstanding Attorney General — please give Eric Schneiderman a big round of applause,” Mr. Obama said. “He is doing the right thing on behalf of consumers and working people all across this great state and having an influence all across the country.”

For his part, Mr. Clinton declared, “I want to thank Eric Schneiderman for his lucid statement of the case of what’s at stake in this election, and for his exceptional service to the state of New York.”

View Mr. Schneiderman’s full prepared remarks below:

Together we can do great things. Together we can make sure all Americans have a fair shot. Together we can make sure everybody does their fair share. Together we can ensure that everyone plays by one set of rules.

And together, we can re-elect our president this November and make sure America has the leader we need for four more years.

No one has spoken more clearly on this than the great leader I am so honored to introduce.

He is a great leader not only a Democratic leader. He is a world leader. Someone who puts progressive values into practice and left a record of accomplishment, of prosperity and budget surpluses that stand in stark contrast to the Romney/ Republican agenda.

To see what is at stake in this election, look no further than the record of our last Democratic president compared to the last republican. Under President Clinton’s leadership, 23 million jobs were created. We balanced the budget and produced a record surplus of 236 billion dollars when President Clinton left office.

Then what happened? Eight years of George W. bush plunged our country into the worst economic disaster since the great depression. All those tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires we were promised would lead to jobs for the middle class never materialized. President Bush left office with the worst jobs record of any president since the government started recording employment figures.

That record surplus? It turned into a record deficit.

President Obama inherited an economy in free fall, with skyrocketing health care costs, dwindling employment, and banking and housing markets on the brink of collapse.

He stabilized the financial system and helped to prevent a second great depression. An economy that was losing 700,000 jobs a month is now gaining jobs. We still have a long way to go, but we are now moving forward on the road to recovery.

Given how much is on the line for everyday Americans, why in the world would we hand over the white house to the same people that left our country in a much worse place than they found it?

The same recipe for economic failure is what Mitt Romney’s serving. And I believe the American people will say “Thanks, but no thanks” to a third term for George W. Bush.

We will continue and build upon the progress President Obama has made. We will show the American people that when there is a Democrat in the White House, a strong and fair economy is possible. It’s possible because we’ve done it, and we’ll do it again.

Ladies and gentlemen, please give a warm welcome to the leader whose record proves the need to stay on the current path and why we cannot afford to erase the progress we’ve made so far. Ladies and gentlemen, the 42nd President of the United States, William Jefferson Clinton.