Exhibitionists, Show Offs Love Living In High Line Apartments

highline Exhibitionists, Show Offs Love Living In High Line Apartments

Show yourself! (Aguinalda Rocca, flickr)

Modesty has never been New York’s strong suit, but some residents are so dismissive of the so-called virtue that they’ve purchased apartments in the new buildings along the High Line simply for the thrill of seeing and being seen.

While some of the residents of older buildings along the park were unhappy to find their daily routines become a spectacle, The New York Times reports that new buildings like HL23, Ten23 and 245 Tenth attract people who enjoy being on display.

“The people who walk by think this is the most amazing place to live,” Michele Yogel, who lives on the fifth floor of one of the buildings, told The Times.

Others said that they enjoy decorating for the masses—which is almost as good as having one’s home featured in a home decor magazine, really. Although unlike a photo shoot, the exposure is ongoing: one resident said that moving in had made him meticulous with his cleaning. He checked that everything was pristine before opening the blinds.

Of course, even those who fully embrace the voyeuristic aspects of their new home—like the couple S.J. Zaremba and Sarah Mackie, who bought a third-floor apartment facing the High Line in May, but have yet to buy blinds, have their limits. Pointing out the apartment beneath them, Ms. Mackie explained, “That apartment has no privacy.”

The architect of HL23 told The Times that he had designed the building with the idea in mind that those living on the lower floors would be attracted to “a public-private discourse.”

Or, as Matthew Amico, a vice president at Prudential Douglas Elliman representing one of the very, very public listings phrased it: “It’s reality-TV living.”

Of course, residents whose homes are on view have really nice homes, which may account for their willingness to, well, show off.

“I have no problem living in this bubble,” Katya Valvich, the inhabitant of an apartment in full view of the crowds told The Times. “It’s the best bubble.”