Morning Read: Replacing Seabrook; Still Battling Vito; Paul Ryan’s Latino Impact

A fire created mass panic for countless Brooklyn commuters yesterday evening, and the MTA’s handling of it could have been better.

A Tim Bishop fundraising solicitation is drawing scrutiny.

Former wrestling executive Linda McMahon will be the GOP nominee in Connecticut for the U.S. Senate. Expect lots of ads in the New York City media market, as she spent $50 million vying for the same job in 2010.

Quote Mayor Bloomberg, “The Republicans walking away from the Latino community is about as dumb a strategy as any political party has ever adopted.”

The New York Times and the Daily News approved.

Eliot Spitzer and Al D’amato agree: Paul Ryan was a bad pick for Mitt Romney.

Former Rep. Tom Reynolds discussed serving alongside Ryan in the House.

The Bronx Democratic Party is getting behind Andy King in the special election to replace Larry Seabrook.

The vast, vast majority of New Yorkers don’t want Chick-fil-A restrictions.

Wendy Long penned an op-ed criticizing Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand on financial regulation.

Mike Gianaris blasted Marty Golden for his microstamping walk-out.

WNYC profiled Jumaane Williams, especially regarding his Tourette’s Syndrome.

Jimmy Meng lawyered up.

The Post used some ink today to slam Bill Thompson over his signage fines.

Jose Rivera’s opponent Ricky Martinez gave his pitch on The Perez Notes.

The Goatham Gazette profiled the status of the New Kings Democrats.

Crain’s took a look at Brooklyn reformers’ effort to elect a Civil Court judge.

The Daily News profiled Brownsville, the city’s most dangerous neighborhood this summer.

“It didn’t take long for the watch-it, buster, I’m-a-bodacious-truth-teller verbiage to start flowing,” began Michael Powell’s latest column, opining on Chris Christie’s convention role.

Romney’s campaign released another Spanish-language ad. It doesn’t reference Paul Ryan, who might not be the best candidate to pick up Latino voters.

Ryan’s impact in the polls has been hard to measure so far.

A utility company’s role in backing the Democratic convention has been questioned.