MoMA to Present Two-Part Exhibition and Live Performances

moma performinghistories sheseesinherselfanewwomaneveryday8 MoMA to Present Two Part Exhibition and Live Performances

Martha Rosler. ‘She Sees in Herself A New Woman Every Day (Detail).’ 1976. Twelve chromogenic color prints, Plexiglas, and tape recorder. 17:21 min. Committee on Media and Performance Art Funds. © 2012 Martha Rosler (Courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York).

On Sept. 12, the Museum of Modern Art will unveil two new performance-based exhibitions. “Performing Histories (I)” is the first of a two-part exhibition organized by Sabine Breitwieser, chief curator of the media and performance art department, that explores the variety of ways media art has engaged with history and will include recent additions to the museum’s collection. On the same day, the museum will also unveil a three-part performance series with an almost identical title, “Performing Histories,” which will present three live performances in conjunction with three exhibitions in the museum.

“Performance Histories (1)” will showcase nine works by some heavyweights of performance art, including The Interpreter Project (2001), a four-channel video by Sharon Hayes; She Sees in Herself A New Woman Every Day, a 1976 work by Martha Rosler that features photographs of a woman’s shoes and legs and a tape recorder; and Open Your Eyes, a 2010 double slide projection by Kader Attia that explores modern Western aesthetics.

The live performance series begins with Andrea Fraser’s Men on the Line: Men Committed to Feminism, KPFK, 1972 (2012), a work based on a 1972 radio broadcast during which four men chatted on a slew of issues related to feminism. After the first performance, the series will continue in January and through the spring with such artists as Ei Arakawa, Fabian Barba, Andrea Geyer, Contact Gonzo, Sharon Hayes, Simone Forti, Eiko and Koma and Kelly Nipper, among others.

Ms. Rosler herself will be at MoMA in November when she holds her Meta-Monumental Garage Sale in MoMA’s atrium, selling off a mix of personal and donated items.