6 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before October 12

  • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9

    Artist Talk: Barbara Kasten at Aperture
    Photographer Barbara Kasten, whose work experiments with geometric shapes and lighting, will speak at the Aperture Foundation. —Michael H. Miller
    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore, 547 West 27th Street, Fourth Floor, New York, 6:30 p.m.

    Presentation: “Stillspotting NYC Finale,” at the Guggenheim
    Buddhist writer and academic Robert Thurman gives a presentation called “On Stillness,” novelist Ben Marcus offers a reflection on notions of poetic silence and historian Emily Thompson explores the history of noise as it pertains to New York City. These are just three of the many thought-leaders from a range of disciplines coming together to offer their reflections, presentations and interventions in the final event in the exhibition series Stillspotting NYC, run by the Guggenheim and Unsound (the creators of the festival of the same name). Architects, scientists, musicians, artists and city planners present a kind of variety show of talks, reflections, readings and films in an effort to reconsider how manmade environments can bring more calm and stillness to our lives. In the museum’s rotunda, participants in the program will revisit aspects of the site-specific commissions that took place in each of the five boroughs over the course of the series. Tickets here. —Rozalia Jovanovic
    Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York, 7 p.m., $10/$5 students.

    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10

    Presentation: “MotorPark,” at Marianne Boesky Gallery
    Lisi Raskin and Kimberly Charles Kay present their latest collaboration—a school bus modified and outfitted with a wood-burning stove, a couple of lofts and a back porch. Inspired by the “tiny house movement,” the artists created the space as a kind of exhibition space and think tank on wheels, bringing art shows, lectures and film screenings among other programming to various sites from Portland, Maine, to New York City. Join Ms. Kay and Ms. Raskin in their excellent adventure and see what this “test-site of ideas” is all about. RSVP to employee@luciefontaine.com. The presentation will begin promptly. —R.J.
    Marianne Boesky Gallery, 118 East 64th Street, New York, 7-9 p.m.

    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11

    Discussion: Stories from the New Aesthetic at the New Museum
    The New Aesthetic, an ongoing research project by the writer James Bridle, looks at the intersections of art and technology, among other topics. Mr. Bridle will talk with Aaron Straup Cope, senior engineer at the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, and Joanne McNeil, the editor of Rhizome. —M.H.M.
    The New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 7 p.m., $8

    Opening: Ryan Foerster at Martos Gallery
    Ryan Foerster often uses damaged and spent materials—expired film, worked-over metal printing plates—to make his work. Sometimes he leaves pieces outside in the open air, handing off control of his work to outside forces. The results are melancholic, raw, beautiful records of decay, order slowly coming undone. In the news release for the show, Mr. Foerster’s first solo outing since a 2008 exhibition at the Swiss Institute, Hannah Buonaguro writes, “Tangled into the images he shows are the ideas of presence and absence, love and longing, dates of expiry and of birth.” That’s grand, expansive language, and perfect. —A.R.
    Martos Gallery, 540 West 29th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

    Discussion: “Warhol’s Orbit: Three Writers, Thirty Years” at CUNY’s James Gallery
    According to Christopher Hitchens, Andy Warhol once told one of his assistants, “You should write less, and tape-record more. It’s more modern.” John Yau, Wayne Koestenbaum and Megan Volpert will explore Warhol’s “influence on the literary arts,” and discuss the Met’s current blockbuster, “Regarding Warhol.” —A.R.
    CUNY Graduate Center for the Humanities, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, 6:30 p.m.