Morning Read: 'The Definition of Chutzpah'

brooklyn getty Morning Read: 'The Definition of Chutzpah'

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Yesterday afternoon, Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer and Spike Lee beefed a little over Twitter over the then-upcoming Brooklyn Nets game against the “Manhattan Knicks.” Mr. Markowitz, who’s met and praised Mr. Lee in the past, attempted to start a Twitter bet with the filmmaker but apparently he was too preoccupied to engage.

“They’re going to wait and see what the Department of Justice — which we’ve been working with – their final determination,” Rep. Michael Grimm said of the Department of Justice investigation. “And like I’ve said from the beginning, any logical inquiry is going to yield that there was no wrongdoing. So we just to have to continue with the process.”

Grover Norquist, upset that Rep. Pete King is willing to compromise on taxes, sarcastically declared his hope that Mr. King’s “wife understands that commitments last a little longer than two years.”

Term-limited Councilman Jim Gennaro certainly isn’t ruling out staying in public life. “I’m focused on winding up my very happy career in the Council for the last 11 years as a member and the 12 years before that as a staff member to the Council,” he said on Capital Tonight. “I guess like anyone, I have my eye on what I could be doing as of January 1st, 2014, but that’s kind of the subject for another day.”

The New York Post is happy that Council Speaker Christine Quinn will, according to sources, attempt to put Assemblyman Vito Lopez in another City Council district. Whether or not she can do anything short of an up-or-down vote rejection of the plan is difficult to discern, as is whether or not Mr. Lopez’s residence is that big of a deal: He reportedly doesn’t live at his purported address as it is, and he would only need to get a new address after winning the councilmanic primary.

We enjoyed this article on GOP mayoral candidate Tom Allon:

“The definition of chutzpah,” Tom Allon tells us, “is when the New York Times tries to decide who’s Jewish and who’s not, and who is a major or minor candidate.” Expect Allon to use lots of Yiddish and Hebrew words as he ramps up his campaign for mayor — which we are reluctant to characterize for fear of being called chutzpahdik — now that Allon is the only Jewish declared candidate in next year’s race for City Hall. (Manhattan Beep Scott Stringer dropped out.)…

He even has a Hebrew last name, though he doesn’t believe he’s related to Gen. Yigal Allon, known for an eponymous plan to partition the West Bank from Israel after the Six-Day War.

“Identity politics helps,” said Allon, who is president and CEO of Manhattan Media. “I already have [appealed to Jews] and have already gained some quiet support, the same way others will try to play identity politics to appeal to people in the Jewish community.” Support for tax credits to aid families that pay for religious school education will be popular, he claims. “I’m a big believer in them,” he said. “At the end of the day when people start focusing on this race and people look at who has the best ideas and management background [they will pick me.]“

Congressman-elect Sean Patrick Maloney gave his first televised interview since he won his election: