12 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before March 3

  • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25

    Panel: An Evening with The New Inquiry, ‘What Was The Date?’ With Max Fox, Samhita Mukhopadhyay, Mandy Stadtmiller, Mike Thomsen, Emily Witt and Adrian Chen at The Kitchen
    This ain’t too art-related but you should go. —Dan Duray
    The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 7 p.m.

    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26

    Opening: “Impressionism, Fashion and Modernity” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
    The Met’s new blockbuster exhibition isn’t only for fashion fanatics and Impressionism enthusiasts, though both groups will be blown away by the art and ensembles on view. The show is essential for anyone who loves writers like Zola, Baudelaire and Proust (all of whom are quoted throughout the wall text, weighing in on women’s wear) as it vividly conjures the world they and their characters occupied. It’s a transporting show well worth the inevitable soul-crushingly long lines. —Zoë Lescaze
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, 9:30-5:15 p.m.

    Concert: Consonant Abstraction: Claude Debussy and Steve Reich at MoMA
    As part of MoMA’s “Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925″ show, alumni and faculty of the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival will perform works by two great musical abstractionists, the composers Claude Debussy and Steve Reich. Mr. Reich will be on hand after the concert to talk about his work with David Lang. —Andrew Russeth
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 6 p.m., $10

    Opening: Peter Hujar at Pace/MacGil
    Peter Hujar’s first show at Pace/MacGill will present the artist’s black and white nudes and portraits, including his never before exhibited triptych of Bruce de Saint Croix. —Michael H. Miller
    Pace/MacGill, 32 East 57th Street, 9th floor, New York, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

    WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27

    Discussion: Ruba Katrib on Michel Houellebecq’s The Possibility of an Island at P!
    The fledgling Lower East Side space P! has devoted its third set of programs to “an extended inquiry into the nature and means of copying.” On this evening, SculptureCenter Curator Ruba Katrib will lead a discussion of Michel Houellebecq’s 2005 novel The Possibility of an Island, which, fittingly enough, concerns the goings-on of a ‘real’ human and two of his clones. —A.R.
    P!, 334 Broome Street, New York, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

    Panel: “Art, Politics, Protest,” at the National Academy Museum & School of Fine Arts
    Cornel West and Faith Ringgold will discuss Ms. Ringgold’s work in the broader context of art and politics. Moderated by Leslie King-Hammond.–M.H.M.
    National Academy Museum, 1083 Fifth Avenue, New York, 6:30-8 p.m.

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28

    Opening: Will Ryman “America,” Arman “Cycles” at Paul Kasmin Gallery
    Two big openings from Paul Kasmin this week. On 27th street, Will Ryman’s “America” “appropriates Abraham Lincoln’s boyhood cabin to stand as an iconic emblem of American socioeconomic conflict during the Civil War and its eventual transformation. The cabin, coated in gold resin, is composed of an amalgam of American products and objects, each possessing their own history and American symbolism.” Over on 10th Avenue, Arman presents his Duchampian Bicycles series. —D.D.
    Paul Kasmin, Gallery, 515 West 27th Street, and just around the corner at 293 10th Avenue, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: Al Held at Cheim & Read
    Size matters when it comes to Al Held’s colossal “alphabet paintings” from the 1960s, some of which measure a massive 16 feet across. The bold acrylic-on-canvas works evoke billboards, but Held’s abstraction of the letters complicates their association with signs and commentary on language. We’re looking forward to feeling tiny in the face of these monumental masterpieces. –Z.L.
    Cheim & Read, 547 West 25th Street, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: “Interior,” at Tibor de Nagy
    Barry Rosen curates a group show focusing on the theme of interior space, including work by Joe Brainard, Jane Freilicher, Fairfield Porter and Larry Rivers. –M.H.M.
    Tibor de Nagy, 724 Fifth Avenue, New York, 5-7 p.m.

    FRIDAY, MARCH 1

    Opening: Virginia Overton at Mitchell–Innes & Nash (Chelsea)
    Everyone loves Virginia Overton and this exhibition promises to be something special. It “will engage the gallery architecture using lumber from trees harvested from Overton’s family farm in Tennessee.” How could you not go? Go! —D.D.
    Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th street, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: Walter Robinson at Dorian Grey Gallery
    Pictures Generation painter, former Artnet magazine editor, Gallery Beat cohost, Artspace columnist, curator and all-around art maven Walter Robinson will present his latest paintings. He’s the Morandi of Americana, responsible for heartbreaking depictions of fast food (juicy cheeseburgers, syrup-slathered waffles), beer bottles and pornography. —A.R.
    Dorian Grey Gallery, 437 East 9th Street, New York, 6–9 p.m.

    SUNDAY, MARCH 3

    Opening: Charles Harlan, “Cave,” at JTT
    Charles Harlan does nice things with materiality and the preview image for this show is a pickle in a bottle. No brainer for me: I love pickles, and their materiality. —D.D.
    JTT, 170A Suffolk Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • This ain't too art-related but you should go. —Dan Duray
    The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 7 p.m.

  • The Met’s new blockbuster exhibition isn't only for fashion fanatics and Impressionism enthusiasts, though both groups will be blown away by the art and ensembles on view. The show is essential for anyone who loves writers like Zola, Baudelaire and Proust (all of whom are quoted throughout the wall text, weighing in on women’s wear) as it vividly conjures the world they and their characters occupied. It’s a transporting show well worth the inevitable soul-crushingly long lines. —Zoë Lescaze
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, 9:30-5:15 p.m.

  • As part of MoMA's "Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925" show, alumni and faculty of the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival will perform works by two great musical abstractionists, the composers Claude Debussy and Steve Reich. Mr. Reich will be on hand after the concert to talk about his work with David Lang. —Andrew Russeth
    Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 6 p.m., $10

  • Peter Hujar's first show at Pace/MacGill will present the artist's black and white nudes and portraits, including his never before exhibited triptych of Bruce de Saint Croix. —Michael H. Miller
    Pace/MacGill, 32 East 57th Street, 9th floor, New York, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

  • The fledgling Lower East Side space P! has devoted its third set of programs to "an extended inquiry into the nature and means of copying." On this evening, SculptureCenter Curator Ruba Katrib will lead a discussion of Michel Houellebecq's 2005 novel The Possibility of an Island, which, fittingly enough, concerns the goings-on of a 'real' human and two of his clones. —A.R.
    P!, 334 Broome Street, New York, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

  • Cornel West and Faith Ringgold will discuss Ms. Ringgold's work in the broader context of art and politics. Moderated by Leslie King-Hammond.--M.H.M.
    National Academy Museum, 1083 Fifth Avenue, New York, 6:30-8 p.m.

  • Two big openings from Paul Kasmin this week. On 27th street, Will Ryman's "America" "appropriates Abraham Lincoln’s boyhood cabin to stand as an iconic emblem of American socioeconomic conflict during the Civil War and its eventual transformation. The cabin, coated in gold resin, is composed of an amalgam of American products and objects, each possessing their own history and American symbolism." Over on 10th Avenue, Arman presents his Duchampian Bicycles series. —D.D.
    Paul Kasmin, Gallery, 515 West 27th Street, and just around the corner at 293 10th Avenue, 6-8 p.m.

  • Size matters when it comes to Al Held’s colossal “alphabet paintings” from the 1960s, some of which measure a massive 16 feet across. The bold acrylic-on-canvas works evoke billboards, but Held's abstraction of the letters complicates their association with signs and commentary on language. We’re looking forward to feeling tiny in the face of these monumental masterpieces. –Z.L.
    Cheim & Read, 547 West 25th Street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Barry Rosen curates a group show focusing on the theme of interior space, including work by Joe Brainard, Jane Freilicher, Fairfield Porter and Larry Rivers. –M.H.M.
    Tibor de Nagy, 724 Fifth Avenue, New York, 5-7 p.m.

  • Everyone loves Virginia Overton and this exhibition promises to be something special. It "will engage the gallery architecture using lumber from trees harvested from Overton’s family farm in Tennessee." How could you not go? Go! —D.D.
    Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Pictures Generation painter, former Artnet magazine editor, Gallery Beat cohost, Artspace columnist, curator and all-around art maven Walter Robinson will present his latest paintings. He's the Morandi of Americana, responsible for heartbreaking depictions of fast food (juicy cheeseburgers, syrup-slathered waffles), beer bottles and pornography. —A.R.
    Dorian Grey Gallery, 437 East 9th Street, New York, 6–9 p.m.

  • Charles Harlan does nice things with materiality and the preview image for this show is a pickle in a bottle. No brainer for me: I love pickles, and their materiality. —D.D.
    JTT, 170A Suffolk Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

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