8 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before February 25

  • MONDAY FEBRUARY 18

    Opening: “Kristina Lee & Annie Pearlman: The Broadway Boogie Woogie” at Malraux’s Place
    Here is a cool thing to do today: the sharp new gallery Malraux’s Place has an opening for Lee and Pearlman, and though I am not acquainted with either it does sound like a good time. The press release on Lee: “her masked heroines rhythmically hack their way through the underbrush.” Pearlman: “she depicts the ‘practices which an urbanistic system was supposed to administer or suppress, but which have outlived its decay.'” I love those practices! Go! —Dan Duray
    253 36th Street, Brooklyn, 7-9 p.m.

    TUESDAY FEBRUARY 19

    Opening: Alan Uglow at David Zwirner
    Bob Nickas organizes an exhibition of works by the late Alan Uglow, who has not had a solo exhibition in the States for over a decade. —Michael H. Miller
    David Zwirner, 519 West 19th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    THURSDAY FEBRUARY 21

    Opening: Jim Dine at Pace
    New work by the Pop-y Jim Dine, large-scale pieces that “verge on pure abstraction, with palettes that range from vivid to grisaille.” —D.D.
    510 West 25th Street, 6 – 8 p.m.

    Opening and Panel: Gimme More: Is Augmented Reality the Next Medium? at Eyebeam
    Swiss design center EPFL + ECAL Lab is bringing its award-winning exhibition of reality-altering art technology to Eyebeam, where viewers will play with their perception, becoming active participants in the trippy projections, animations and other wacky new media pieces. Opening night will feature a conversation between various digital arts scholars, architects and design strategists. —Zoë Lescaze
    Eyebeam, 540 W. 21st Street, New York, 6-7:30 p.m.

    Opening: Alsoudani, Bacon, Guston, Rego at Marlborough
    Like Ahmed Alsoudani, Francis Bacon, Philip Guston, Paula Rego? Sure you do! Now imagine them all mixed together for a poignant “dialogue on influence, perspective and expressionism.” — D.D.
    Marlborough, 545 W. 25th Street, 6-8 p.m.

    FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22

    Aura Rosenberg, “I Know It When I See It,” at Martos Gallery
    Aura Rosenberg’s first solo show with Martos Gallery is inspired by porn stars, Freud, astrological signs and Goldfinger. There’s a performance at 7 p.m. —M.H.M.
    Martos Gallery, 540 West 29th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23

    Talk: “do it”: Hans Ulrich Obrist and Massimiliano Gioni in conversation, moderated by Kate Fowle at the New Museum
    Twenty years ago, Serpentine Gallery co-director Hans Urlich Obrist created “do it,” an ongoing exhibition consisting of artists’ instructions that are carried out on site. (The first three steps of Marina Abramovic’s poetic, if biologically draining, contribution dictate: “Mix Fresh Milk From the Breast / With Fresh Milk Of The Sperm / Drink on Earthquake Nights.”) Mr. Obrist will discuss the origins and iterations of the project with New Museum associate director Massimiliano Gioni in conjunction with the “1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star” show. — Z.L.
    New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 3 p.m., $8

    Opening: William J. O’Brien, “Wet ‘N Wild,” at Marianne Boesky
    The Chicago-based artist William J. O’Brien will show work relating to “the body’s movement and impulse” through a variety of mediums, including works on paper, ceramic, powder-coated steel and felt. —M.H.M.
    Marianne Boesky, 509 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • Here is a cool thing to do today: the sharp new gallery Malraux's Place has an opening for Lee and Pearlman, and though I am not acquainted with either it does sound like a good time. The press release on Lee: "her masked heroines rhythmically hack their way through the underbrush." Pearlman: "she depicts the 'practices which an urbanistic system was supposed to administer or suppress, but which have outlived its decay.'" I love those practices! Go! —Dan Duray
    253 36th Street, Brooklyn, 7-9 p.m.

  • New work by the Pop-y Jim Dine, large-scale pieces that "verge on pure abstraction, with palettes that range from vivid to grisaille." —D.D.
    510 West 25th Street, 6 - 8 p.m.

  • Swiss design center EPFL + ECAL Lab is bringing its award-winning exhibition of reality-altering art technology to Eyebeam, where viewers will play with their perception, becoming active participants in the trippy projections, animations and other wacky new media pieces. Opening night will feature a conversation between various digital arts scholars, architects and design strategists. —Zoë Lescaze
    Eyebeam, 540 W. 21st Street, New York, 6-7:30 p.m.

  • Like Ahmed Alsoudani, Francis Bacon, Philip Guston, Paula Rego? Sure you do! Now imagine them all mixed together for a poignant "dialogue on influence, perspective and expressionism." — D.D.
    Marlborough, 545 W. 25th Street, 6-8 p.m.

  • Aura Rosenberg’s first solo show with Martos Gallery takes as inspiration porn stars, Freud, astrological signs and Goldfinger. There’s a performance at 7 p.m.—M.H.M.
    Martos Gallery, 540 West 29th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • Twenty years ago, Serpentine Gallery co-director Hans Urlich Obrist created “do it,” an ongoing exhibition consisting of artists’ instructions that are carried out on site. (The first three steps of Marina Abramovic’s poetic, if biologically draining, contribution dictate: “Mix Fresh Milk From the Breast / With Fresh Milk Of The Sperm / Drink on Earthquake Nights.”) Mr. Obrist will discuss the origins and iterations of the project with New Museum associate director Massimiliano Gioni in conjunction with the “1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star” show. — Z.L.
    New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 3 p.m., $8

  • The Chicago-based artist William J. O’Brien will show work relating to “the body’s movement and impulse” through a variety of mediums, including works on paper, ceramic, powder-coated steel and felt.—M.H.M.
    Marianne Boesky, 509 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

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