Bill Thompson Accuses Quinn of Not Acknowledging Communities Hit by Sandy in State of the City Speech

Bill Thompson

Bill Thompson

This afternoon City Council Speaker Christine Quinn gave her annual State of the City address, which seemed like a stump speech for her assumed mayoral campaign. Accordingly, her rivals who have already launched their mayoral bids issued rebuttals criticizing Ms. Quinn’s address. Bill de Blasio was first out of the gate with a statement blasting Ms. Quinn for failing to live up to her main promise of “creating even greater opportunity for the middle class and those striving to get there.” Bill Thompson followed that with a statement that took Ms. Quinn to task for failing to specifically address the needs of outer borough communities that were most heavily impacted by Hurricane Sandy.

“Speaker Quinn’s State of the City speech today contained a number of very interesting proposals that are worthy of further study,” Mr. Thompson began. “However, it’s important to acknowledge and recognize communities across New York that have been devastated by Sandy, including Rockaway, Red Hook, Coney or Midland Beach, as well as Broad Channel, Howard Beach, Brighton Beach, Breezy Point, Gerritsen Beach, Coney Island, Tottenville, South Beach, Canarsie, Mill Basin, Bergen Beach, Sea Gate, Manhattan Beach, and City Island. We need a mayor with the leadership and vision to support every community in every corner of New York City.”

Though she did not specifically discuss the situation in the neighborhoods hardest hit by the storm, Ms. Quinn made multiple references to the damage the hurricane wrought on the city. In the beginning of her address, she described the desire of “those who were devastated by Sandy” to “rebuild their lives in the five boroughs” as a motivating factor for her political work. She also said her proposals to encourage economic growth would help small business owners who “are still reeling from Sandy’s devastating impact.” Ms. Quinn also presented several policies she said would help middle class residents throughout the city including a plan to create 40,000 units of middle class housing over the next decade.