Morning Links: Timbuktu Edition

People in Mali wait for the arrival of France's president, François Hollande. (Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)

People in Mali wait for the arrival of France’s president, François Hollande. (Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)

Carl Swanson tells the story of Hauser & Wirth, complete with a photograph of dozens of the artists on its roster. [NYMag]

Paul C. Ha, the director of MIT’s List Visual Arts Center, notes the possible Maurizio Cattelan inspiration for one of Pepsi’s Super Bowl ads. [@Paulha8/Twitter]

Jerry Saltz revisits 1993 in the art world, when he was still working as a long-distance truck driver. [NYMag]

Scientists have now decided, “beyond reasonable doubt,” that those bones found underneath a parking lot in Leicester, England, really are the skeleton of King Richard III. [BBC]

How Timbuktu protected its artifacts from militant rebels. [NYT]

“One of the first robots of Western art…” [WSJ]

Sotheby’s teams up with Hill Food Company for fancy tea. [The Art Newspaper]

Installation at the University of Texas projects chyrons onto buildings. [Fast Company]

Ed Koch knew how to photograph himself. [NYT]

Here’s a delightful Talk of the Town about buying for MoMA’s shop. [The New Yorker]