11 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before April 15

Watching a normal movie by Sam Green (the filmmaker behind The Weather Underground, which not only earned an Oscar nomination but also inclusion in the Whitney Biennial) is a great time, but this screening sounds pretty unbeatable. Yo La Tengo will perform a live score and Mr. Green will narrate. Heaven. —Zoë Lescaze
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, New York, 7 and 9 p.m., also April 10
In an age when painters frequently work from photographs and many artists dabble in different media, it’s nice to look back at the tradition of painters picking up cameras. Elizabeth Easton, co-founder and director of the Center for Curatorial Leadership, will shed some light on thousands of recently discovered late 19th-century photographs taken by painters like Edgar Degas, Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Vuillard. —Z.L.
The Frick, 1 East 70th Street, New York, 6–7 p.m.
Stanley Whitney, the master painter of effervescently colored grids, returns for his third solo show at Team. What a name for a show! Also opening this evening is Team's Santiago Sierra show, "Veterans," which features photos of war veterans facing the corners of rooms. —Andrew Russeth
Team Gallery, 83 Grand Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
More than 200 dealers from around the world will present their wares at the 53rd edition of this redoubtable annual event. Sunday, from 12 to 3 p.m., is Discovery Day; visitors can bring by their holdings for informal appraisals with dealers. Should be a nice time. —A.R.
Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue, New York, 5–9 p.m., $40 for preview with others hours and various ticket prices through Sunday
The openings at Observer columnist and billionaire collector Adam Lindemann's gallery are not to be missed. Here the work of William Copley will be paired with that of Big Fat Black Cock Inc., which duplicates Copley's sexually explicit paintings but replaces the Causasian couplers with black people. Geez, I hope nobody from the rest of America is reading this right now. —Dan Duray
Venus Over Manhattan, 980 Madison Avenue, Third Floor, New York, 6–9 p.m.
There's no reception, but if you're in Chelsea this weekend why not swing by David Zwirner's new show of early works by Richard Serra? With pieces dating from 1966 to 1972, it should be a nice surprise for anyone who's only familiar with his monolithic works. —D.D.
David Zwirner, 537 West 20th Street, New York, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Saturday
The Kitchen's playing this one close to its chest, saying only on the website that the Belgian filmmaker's solo show features video "shot at her residences in different countries." It's curated by Lumi Tan and Tim Griffin, though, so you know it'll be good. —D.D.
The Kitchen, 512 West 19 Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
Amanda Ross-Ho’s second solo show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash will include the eclectic mélange of materials she’s known for: jewelry, textiles, found images and ephemera that will, according to the press release, “loop back in transmuted forms.” —Z.L.
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
As part of their retrospective "The Works: Karen Black," Nitehawk Cinema will screen the 1976 horror film Burnt Offerings, about a supernatural house and a murderous chauffeur, starring Dennis Hopper's one-time muse and art house actress extraordinaire Karen Black. —Michael H. Miller
Nitehawk Cinema, 136 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 12:05 a.m., $11, also screening April 13
Jane Freilicher, the New York School painter who ran around with poets like Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery, will be the focus of the first exhibition ever to deal with her art and its relationship to her poet friends and their writing.—M.H.M.
Tibor de Nagy, 724 Fifth Avenue, New York, 4–6 p.m.

TUESDAY, APRIL 9

Screening: Sam Green and Yo La Tengo, “The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller,” at The Kitchen
Watching a normal movie by Sam Green (the filmmaker behind The Weather Underground, which not only earned an Oscar nomination but also inclusion in the Whitney Biennial) is a great time, but this screening sounds pretty unbeatable. Yo La Tengo will perform a live score and Mr. Green will narrate. Heaven. —Zoë Lescaze
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, New York, 7 and 9 p.m., also April 10

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10

Lecture: “Snapshot: Painters and the Invention of the Kodak Camera” at the Frick
In an age when painters frequently work from photographs and many artists dabble in different media, it’s nice to look back at the tradition of painters picking up cameras. Elizabeth Easton, co-founder and director of the Center for Curatorial Leadership, will shed some light on thousands of recently discovered late 19th-century photographs taken by painters like Edgar Degas, Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Vuillard. —Z.L.
The Frick, 1 East 70th Street, New York, 6–7 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 11

Opening: Stanley Whitney, “Other Colors I Forget,” at Team
Stanley Whitney, the master painter of effervescently colored grids, returns for his third solo show at Team. What a name for a show! Also opening this evening is Team’s Santiago Sierra show, “Veterans,” which features photos of war veterans facing the corners of rooms. —Andrew Russeth
Team Gallery, 83 Grand Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Fair Preview: The New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory
More than 200 dealers from around the world will present their wares at the 53rd edition of this redoubtable annual event. Sunday, from 12 to 3 p.m., is Discovery Day; visitors can bring by their holdings for informal appraisals with dealers. Should be a nice time. —A.R.
Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue, New York, 5–9 p.m., $40 for preview with others hours and various ticket prices through Sunday

Opening: “Gang Bust” at Venus Over Manhattan
The openings at Observer columnist and billionaire collector Adam Lindemann’s gallery are not to be missed. Here the work of William Copley will be paired with that of Big Fat Black Cock Inc., which duplicates Copley’s sexually explicit paintings but replaces the Causasian couplers with black people. Geez, I hope nobody from the rest of America is reading this right now. —Dan Duray
Venus Over Manhattan, 980 Madison Avenue, Third Floor, New York, 6–9 p.m.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Exhibition: Richard Serra at David Zwirner
There’s no reception, but if you’re in Chelsea this weekend why not swing by David Zwirner’s new show of early works by Richard Serra? With pieces dating from 1966 to 1972, it should be a nice surprise for anyone who’s only familiar with his monolithic works. —D.D.
David Zwirner, 537 West 20th Street, New York, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Saturday

Opening: Chantal Akerman, “Maniac Shadows,” at the Kitchen
The Kitchen’s playing this one close to its chest, saying only on the website that the Belgian filmmaker’s solo show features video “shot at her residences in different countries.” It’s curated by Lumi Tan and Tim Griffin, though, so you know it’ll be good. —D.D.
The Kitchen, 512 West 19 Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Amanda Ross-Ho, “Gone Tomorrow,” at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Amanda Ross-Ho’s second solo show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash will include the eclectic mélange of materials she’s known for: jewelry, textiles, found images and ephemera that will, according to the press release, “loop back in transmuted forms.” —Z.L.
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Screening: Burnt Offerings at Nitehawk Cinema
As part of their retrospective “The Works: Karen Black,” Nitehawk Cinema will screen the 1976 horror film Burnt Offerings, about a supernatural house and a murderous chauffeur, starring Dennis Hopper’s one-time muse and art house actress extraordinaire Karen Black. —Michael H. Miller
Nitehawk Cinema, 136 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 12:05 a.m., $11, also screening April 13

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Opening: Jane Freilicher, “Painter Among Poets,” at Tibor de Nagy
Jane Freilicher, the New York School painter who ran around with poets like Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery, will be the focus of the first exhibition ever to deal with her art and its relationship to her poet friends and their writing.—M.H.M.
Tibor de Nagy, 724 Fifth Avenue, New York, 4–6 p.m.

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Exhibitions: “Claes Oldenburg: The Street and The Store” and “Claes Oldenburg: Mouse Museum/Ray Gun Wing” at MoMA
One of the past century’s great artistic innovators, Claes Oldenburg is getting the MoMA treatment. The first show focuses on his seminal works The Street (1960) and The Shop (1961–64), the store he set up in the East Village to ply his ceramic versions of various commonplace objects. The museum’s atrium will also house his Mouse Museum and Ray Gun Wing—large but intimate installations made up of scores of examples of the things mentioned in their titles. I saw a version of these shows at the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Germany, last summer and—whoa!—two huge thumbs up. —A.R.
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.