James Sanders Clarifies ‘Snitching’ Stance Regarding Corruption

James Sanders. (Photo: Facebook)

James Sanders. (Photo: Facebook)

Several days ago, State Senator James Sanders reacted to the news that his predecessor wore a wire in an attempt to reduce her corruption sentence, by criticizing her for “snitching.” Well, the New York Post didn’t take kindly to that, and this morning, the publication editorialized harshly against Mr. Sanders, claiming he “seems to be endorsing the crime-abetting law of street thugs.”

Mr. Sanders released a follow-up statement this afternoon taking exception to the Post‘s characterization. “Snitching,” Mr. Sanders wrote, was only in the context of entrapment, which he insisted the editorial missed.

“In response to the New York Post editorial on May 7, 2013, what was not said speaks volumes,” Mr. Sanders said. “While the Post highlighted a portion of my statement made to the New York Times that mentions ‘ensnaring’ others, which in the context used, described entrapment, which is prohibit under the law, the article neglected to mention my encouragement to perform a public service by exposing actual corruption that one knows of. Deliberately leading people into a crime that they would not have committed, be they legislators or private individuals, is wrong and shows no honor. I have always and will always encourage full cooperation with law enforcement to root out real corruption.”

The state senator’s comments, of course, come as New York State has been rocked by multiple corruption scandals, not the least of which involves State Senator Shirley Huntley, his wire-wearing predecessor, who is due to be sentenced on Thursday. Additional information Ms. Huntley collected is due to be released at 2 p.m. this afternoon.

Mr. Sanders’ full “snitching” quote to The New York Times was appended to his statement today:

“There are few among us who can stand up to 20, 30, 40 years without, as the streets call, snitching,” [Senator Sanders] said. “I think that it is tragic that one finds themselves in a world of pain and even more tragic if you’re trying to buy down your sentence by ensnaring others,” Mr.Sanders added. “Now, if you are merely speaking of what they have done, then you’re probably doing a public service. But if you are ensnaring people, then it just proves you have no honor.”

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