And Yet We’re Not Fully Convinced Putting Butter in Coffee Will Lead to Weight Loss

'I learned about the power of butter at 18,000 feet elevation near Mt. Kailash in Tibet when I staggered into a guest house from the -10 degree weather and was literally rejuvenated by a creamy cup of yak butter tea.'

Get some butter up in there, stat. (Getty)

Get some butter up in there, stat. (Getty)

Finally, a weight loss plan that even Paula Deen can get behind.

According to someone who stands to make a lot of money from people putting butter in their coffee, doing just that can provide a performance-enhancing energy boost and kick-start your weight-loss regime.

Silicon Valley investor and self-proclaimed “biohacker” Dave Asprey apparently increased his IQ by more than 20 points, lowered his biological age and lost 100 pounds “without using calories and exercise” by engineering the “Bulletproof” diet and overall life plan. His claims that Bulletproof® Coffee, infused with grass-fed butter, is the key to increased energy and tremendous weight loss.

“Just putting butter into bad coffee is a bad idea,” Mr. Asprey told the Daily News. “I re-engineered the process of making green coffee, it’s called the Bulletproof process and it affects how the coffee is grown, how it’s treated and how it’s shipped to the U.S. It’s a huge difference.”

Thanks for the super-scientific details.

“I learned about the power of butter at 18,000 feet elevation near Mt. Kailash in Tibet when I staggered into a guest house from the -10 degree weather and was literally rejuvenated by a creamy cup of yak butter tea,” Mr. Asprey writes on his website. “The biohacker in me asked, ‘why?’ and that was the genesis of my recipe below, which is widely heralded as a cognitive enhancing recipe. … It allows you to transform your diet without resorting to chewing on sticks of butter (though that’s not a bad idea…).”

Bulletproof® Upgraded coffee consists of a “magic combination” of three ingredients: upgraded coffee, MCT (medium-chain triglycerides) coconut palm oil and grass-fed butter. A ¾-pound bag of the good stuff retails for $18.95 and nets between 100 and 200 calories, depending on the amount of butter added.

It can’t be much worse than the hazelnut syrup we put in our Starbucks java, but excuse us if we aren’t running out for butter-infused coffee just yet.

Screengrab from bulletproofexec.com

Screengrab from bulletproofexec.com.