NYPD Says Nik Wallenda’s Skyscraper Stunt Won’t Fly

Nik Wallenda walks without any harnesses or any safety precautions on a tightrope stretched across the Little Colorado River Gorge near the Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013.  The two-inch (five-centimeter) thick wireline starting from a Navajo reservation just outside of the Grand Canyon National Park is suspended 1,500 feet (450 meters) above the ground (about 50 feet higher than the Empire State Building) and is 1,400 feet long (about the length of five football fields).  US daredevil Nik Wallenda became the first man to cross the Grand Canyon on a tightrope Sunday, completing his latest record-breaking feat in just under 23 minutes.       AFP PHOTO /JOE KLAMAR        (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Nik Wallenda walks without any harnesses across the Little Colorado River Gorge near the Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013. (Photo: Joe Kalmar/AFP/Getty Images)

New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly shot down a proposed plan by daredevil Nik Wallenda to tightrope between the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

“I would say no,” Mr. Kelly told reporters Monday when asked about Mr. Wallenda’s idea of making the 4,000-foot trek above Midtown Manhattan.

Last night on live television, Mr. Wallenda traversed Arizona’s Little Colorado River Gorge near the Grand Canyon on a wire without any harnesses and afterwards said he was eying the city as the site of his next stunt, according to reports.

But Mr. Kelly noted that, while the mouth of the Grand Canyon has water underneath it, the city is home to hundreds of thousands of pedestrians who would be put at risk.

“I don’t think it would be wise in this city,” he said.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg was also asked about the proposal, but dismissed the question as frivolous at a press conference on police issues.

Mr. Wallenda, a member of the “Flying Wallendas”  family, recently crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope as well.