15 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before September 16

I know, I know, I'm with you: after the mayhem that has ensued over the past two or three seasons in New York, no one should even be allowed to use the words "performance art" for a decade or so. But this show, originally by Valerie Cassel Oliver for the Contemporary Art Museum Houston, sounds like it will be great, offering a 50-year survey of work by U.S. and Caribbean artists of African descent using performance. Artists range from giants like Lorraine O’Grady, Adrian Piper, William Pope.L (whose work is pictured) and David Hammons to promising younger figures like Jacolby Satterwhite, Kalup Linzy and Adam Pendleton. Note: this is part one of a two parter; the second part opens at the Studio Museum in November. —Andrew Russeth
Grey Art Gallery, 100 Washington Square East, New York, 6–8 p.m.
A solo show debut for Robert Davis in New York. Plus who doesn't love Half Gal? —Dan Duray
Half Gallery, 43 East 78th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
The beloved artist and curator Rose Marcus recently underwent emergency surgery so her friends, who happen to be great artists, are holding a benefit auction for her to help pay her hospital bill. Should be a great time and there are some great buys (preview the auction here). —D.D.
Cleopatra's, 110 Meserole Avenue, Brooklyn, 6-8 p.m.
Ashley Bickerton will have his fourth solo show at the gallery, a new collection of paintings. —Michael H. Miller
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
Advertisement
Laurie Simmons opens a new show at the Metropolitan Opera House ahead of Nico Muhly's "Two Boys." Organized by Dodie Kazanjian. —D.D.
The Arnold and Marie Schwartz Gallery, the Met Opera, Lincoln Center, New York, 6-8 p.m.
After a summer spent gazing up at Raymond Pettibon's dynamic baseball drawing on the High Line Billboard, fans of the artist's ever clever collages and works on paper will get a chance to view new pieces at eye level. —Zoë Lescaze
David Zwirner, 519 West 19th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
Sex magazine editor Asher Penn will present diverse work by seven young female artists—Al Baio, Petra Cortright, Maggie Lee, Greem Jellyfish, Bunny Rogers, Analisa Teachworth and Amalia Ulman—who operate on a variety of online platforms, playing with the Internet as an arena for self-expression. —Z.L.
Martos Gallery, 540 West 29th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
Advertisement
A trove of unpublished letters by the reclusive author will go on view, on the heels of a new documentary and book about the writer.--Michael H. Miller Morgan Library, 225 Madison Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m.
For his first solo exhibition in New York City, multimedia artist Jon Rafman will show an array of sculptures, installations and videos that address memory, including "sham" ruins and relics. After traveling around the world with Mr. Rafman via his brilliant Google Street View series, we're excited to see what will be on view, right here in Chelsea. —Z.L.
Zach Feuer, 548 West 22nd Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
Aldo Tambellini has been making avant-garde multimedia art since the early 1960s, burning and scratching slides of his paintings and then projecting them during performance pieces that also involve music, dance and poetry. It's been decades since Mr. Tambellini's striking work has graced a New York gallery, so swing by James Cohan for a long overdue look. —Z.L.
James Cohan Gallery, 533 West 26th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
Advertisement
Robert Ryman will unveil a group of recent works.--M.H.M. Pace Gallery, 508 West 25th Street, New York, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The excellent Virginia Poundstone's new exhibition "revolves around an FTD floral arrangement once sent to the artist as a gift," according to the gallery's Tyler Coburn-penned news release. Expect flowers arrangements made of bronze and glass, pressed-flower wall pieces and flower photos. Should be a good one. —A.R.
Kansas, 59 Franklin Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
Brace yourself. Here comes Bjarne Melgaard with what the gallery is proudly billing as "his most ambitious, tragic and unwieldy exhibition to date." —A.R.
Gavin Brown's Enterprise, 620 Greenwich Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
Advertisement
Boy, did you read Geoff Dyer's review of the new book? So many puns! "He takes a long time to write books so you can't say he's in a..." He liked it though. Maybe you will too? —D.D.
McNally Jackson Books, 52 Prince Street, New York, 6 p.m.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Opening: “Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art” at the Grey Art Gallery
I know, I know, I’m with you: after the mayhem that has ensued over the past two or three seasons in New York, no one should even be allowed to use the words “performance art” for a decade or so. But this show, originally by Valerie Cassel Oliver for the Contemporary Art Museum Houston, sounds like it will be great, offering a 50-year survey of work by U.S. and Caribbean artists of African descent using performance. Artists range from giants like Lorraine O’Grady, Adrian Piper, William Pope.L (whose work is pictured) and David Hammons to promising younger figures like Jacolby Satterwhite, Kalup Linzy and Adam Pendleton. Note: this is part one of a two parter; the second part opens at the Studio Museum in November. —Andrew Russeth
Grey Art Gallery, 100 Washington Square East, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Robert Davis at Half Gallery
A solo show debut for Robert Davis in New York. Plus who doesn’t love Half Gal? —Dan Duray
Half Gallery, 43 East 78th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
Benefit: The Rose Marcus Auction at Cleopatra’s
The beloved artist and curator Rose Marcus recently underwent emergency surgery so her friends, who happen to be great artists, are holding a benefit auction for her to help pay her hospital bill. Should be a great time and there are some great buys (preview the auction here). —D.D.
Cleopatra’s, 110 Meserole Avenue, Brooklyn, 6-8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11

Opening: Ashley Bickerton at Lehmann Maupin
Ashley Bickerton will have his fourth solo show at the gallery, a new collection of paintings. —Michael H. Miller
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Laurie Simmons, “Two Boys” at the Metropolitan Opera
Laurie Simmons opens a new show at the Metropolitan Opera House ahead of Nico Muhly’s “Two Boys.” Organized by Dodie Kazanjian. —D.D.
The Arnold and Marie Schwartz Gallery, the Met Opera, Lincoln Center, New York, 6-8 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

Opening: Raymond Pettibon, “To Wit” at David Zwirner
After a summer spent gazing up at Raymond Pettibon’s dynamic baseball drawing on the High Line Billboard, fans of the artist’s ever clever collages and works on paper will get a chance to view new pieces at eye level. —Zoë Lescaze
David Zwirner, 519 West 19th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Asher Penn’s “Lonely Girl” at Martos Gallery
Sex magazine editor Asher Penn will present diverse work by seven young female artists—Al Baio, Petra Cortright, Maggie Lee, Greem Jellyfish, Bunny Rogers, Analisa Teachworth and Amalia Ulman—who operate on a variety of online platforms, playing with the Internet as an arena for self-expression. —Z.L.
Martos Gallery, 540 West 29th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: “Lose not heart: J.D. Salinger’s Letters to an Aspiring Writer” at the Morgan Library
A trove of unpublished letters by the reclusive author will go on view, on the heels of a new documentary and book about the writer. —M.H.M.
Morgan Library, 225 Madison Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Jon Rafman, “You are standing in an open field” at Zach Feuer
For his first solo exhibition in New York City, multimedia artist Jon Rafman will show an array of sculptures, installations and videos that address memory, including “sham” ruins and relics. After traveling around the world with Mr. Rafman via his brilliant Google Street View series, we’re excited to see what will be on view, right here in Chelsea. —Z.L.
Zach Feuer, 548 West 22nd Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Aldo Tambellini, “We Are The Primitives Of A New Era: Paintings and Projections 1961-1989” at James Cohan Gallery 
Aldo Tambellini has been making avant-garde multimedia art since the early 1960s, burning and scratching slides of his paintings and then projecting them during performance pieces that also involve music, dance and poetry. It’s been decades since Mr. Tambellini’s striking work has graced a New York gallery, so swing by James Cohan for a long overdue look. —Z.L.
James Cohan Gallery, 533 West 26th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Robert Ryman “Recent Paintings” at Pace Gallery
Robert Ryman will unveil a group of recent works. —M.H.M.
Pace Gallery, 508 West 25th Street, New York, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

Opening: Virginia Poundstone, “Total Meltdown” at Kansas
The excellent Virginia Poundstone’s new exhibition “revolves around an FTD floral arrangement once sent to the artist as a gift,” according to the gallery’s Tyler Coburn-penned news release. Expect flowers arrangements made of bronze and glass, pressed-flower wall pieces and flower photos. Should be a good one. —A.R.
Kansas, 59 Franklin Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

Opening: Bjarne Melgaard, “Ignorant Transparencies” at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise
Brace yourself. Here comes Bjarne Melgaard with what the gallery is proudly billing as “his most ambitious, tragic and unwieldy exhibition to date.” —A.R.
Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, 620 Greenwich Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Jamian Juliano-Villani, “Me, Myself and Jah” at Rawson Projects
Jamian Juliano-Villani’s effervescent, action-packed paintings suggest mysterious, alchemical blends of John Wesley, Peter Saul, Archie Comics, Erik Parker, Ken Price and maybe even Richard Lindner. They’re about completely unashamed, unmitigated pleasure: people savoring unwieldy drug trips, indulging out-of-control dreams, basking in deeply unusual erotic episodes. Like all good art, they are also, in their sui generis candor, fairly terrifying. Hilarious, but terrifying. Undoubtedly a must see. —A.R.
Rawson Projects, 223 Franklin Street, Brooklyn, 6–8 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

Talk: Norman Rush in Conversation With Marco Roth
Boy, did you read Geoff Dyer’s review of the new book? So many puns! “He takes a long time to write books so you can’t say he’s in a…” He liked it though. Maybe you will too? —D.D.
McNally Jackson Books, 52 Prince Street, New York, 6 p.m.

We noticed you're using an ad blocker.

We get it: you like to have control of your own internet experience.
But advertising revenue helps support our journalism.

To read our full stories, please turn off your ad blocker.

We'd really appreciate it.

How Do I Whitelist Observer?

How Do I Whitelist Observer?

Below are steps you can take in order to whitelist Observer.com on your browser:

For Adblock:

Click the AdBlock button on your browser and select Don't run on pages on this domain.

For Adblock Plus on Google Chrome:

Click the AdBlock Plus button on your browser and select Enabled on this site.

For Adblock Plus on Firefox:

Click the AdBlock Plus button on your browser and select Disable on Observer.com.

Then Reload the Page