Morning Read: ‘Chill, Bill’

Today's New York Post.

Today’s New York Post.

Headline of the Day: “Oh, behave! Bratton rolls out new community-friendly training protocol.”

Runner-Up: “Bratton: Police officers to be taught ‘verbal judo.’”

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton and Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a new training program yesterday that aims to teach new recruits how to be more polite as part as part of a larger effort to improve police-community relations. “Cops in this city, indeed, around the country, get in more trouble with their mouths than they do with any of the tools we give them–clubs, guns,” Mr. Bratton said after visiting a precinct in East Harlem.

Capital New York has a theory about why Mr. de Blasio is sticking with “what appears to be a losing campaign” for his pre-K plan. The new mayor reportedly believes he “could have one bit of leverage” over Gov. Andrew Cuomo and is looking for Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and State Senate Co-leader Jeff Klein to threaten to hold up the state’s budget if it doesn’t include a tax on the wealthy or other funding–presenting a key challenge for the governor, who has made passing on-time budgets a top priority.

Congressman Charlie Rangel was reportedly blindsided by news that longtime supporter Melissa Mark-Viverito, the new City Council speaker, would endorse Adriano Espaillat in the Democratic primary to represent the 13th Congressional District. “I thought as speaker that she would not be involved in the race,” Mr. Rangel told the Daily News in Washington, expressing confidence in his chances nonetheless. “You’ve just got to play the hand that’s dealt you,” he told the paper. “And I’ve had a good hand for along time, and I think I can play this one well.”

Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who had vowed not to criticize his successor, weighed in yesterday on Mr. de Blasio’s controversial decision to pull the plug on a handful of planned charter school co-locations. “I really am not familiar with what’s going on in New York City — I’ve been traveling a lot,” he told the New York Post in Washington, before adding: “I think the charter movement is one of the most important things in this country … when you have charter schools that work, that’s the pathway to success for kids who otherwise would never be able to break out.”

Moving pros have some advice for Mr. de Blasio, who has yet to move to Gracie Mansion nearly three months after his election: “Moving doesn’t have to be so hard.” Experts told the Daily News the new mayor should “Just call some guys and a truck” or “start thinking like the busy executive he is and leave it to the experts.” But the paper’s editorial board offered conflicting advice, arguing Mr. de Blasio should be focused on filling open cabinet spots instead. “Just stay in Brooklyn — at least for now,” they wrote. “So chill, Bill, and start taking care of business.”

Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña can recommend a book she co-authored to city teachers, but must forgo any extra profits she earns as a result, the city’s Conflicts of Interests Board ruled yesterday, according to the News. Ms. Fariña, the paper said, earned just $131 in 2012 and $555 in 2012 from “A School Leader’s Guide To Excellence,” which she told the board she might want to recommend, if allowed.

And here, via New York True, is Mr. de Blasio’s response yesterday to questions about his Department of Education’s controversial decision to block the previously-approved co-locations of three Success Academy charter schools: