To Do Saturday: Get a Taste of the NFL

Bill Ard. (Photo via Getty Images)

Bill Ard. (Photo via Getty Images)

Are you sad that your team didn’t make it to the Super Bowl? Not to worry—a chef from each NFL city will be cooking up something delicious at football foodie extravaganza Taste of the NFL, where you’ll feast on more than 35 dishes, such as Italian wedding soup and New York cheesecake by Kamal Rose, and tuna and salmon tataki with jalapeño dressing by Taku Sato, both locals. Mingle with former pro football players such as Bill Ard (New York Giants), Freeman McNeil (New York Jets), Craig Terrill (Seattle Seahawks) and Floyd Little (Denver Broncos). Proceeds benefit food banks in each NFL city. Rain or shine, indulge yourself (though not too much if you’re planning to pig out tomorrow) in this 180,000-square-foot heated venue.

Brooklyn Cruise Terminal Pier 12, 72 Bowne Street, 952-835-7621, 7 p.m., $700

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