9 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before March 24

Need reasons to go see this movie? Well, there's Orson Welles as the villainous Harry Lime, some pretty striking expressionist cinematography, that quote about cuckoo clocks (courtesy Graham Greene's screenplay), and it's all set in shady postwar Vienna! How's that for starters? —Zoë Lescaze

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 8 p.m., $12, free for members
Ben Gocker, who is based in Queens and works as a librarian at the Brooklyn Public Library, returns to P.P.O.W. for his sophomore show, which features new large-scale, intimate assemblages and modestly scaled drawings that incorporate books and maps that have been been deaccessioned by his place of employment. From the release: "…the works constitute a new approach to narrative and poetic space, establishing a kind of shades-down dream cartography of wherever or whatever 'Scaredy Cat City' is." Should be a barnburner. (Pictured is Scaredy Cat, 2014.) —A.R.

P.P.O.W., 535 West 22nd Street, Third Floor, New York, 6–8 p.m.
The wily German-born artist Esther Kläs, whose rough-hewn geometric sculptures often like they have mysterious architectural functions—if only you could figure it out!—presents her second show at the gallery. (Pictured is 2014's Untitled (oder: oh je).) —A.R.
Peter Blum, 20 West 57th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
Matthew Brandt is presenting some pretty process-driven photography projects, all dealing in different ways with the past, for his second show at the gallery. In his “Dust” series, Mr. Brandt combines historic photographs of New York buildings (and their demolitions) with dust from their original locations, using the latter "as pigment in a handmade gum-bichromate emulsion.” In the “La Brea” series, the artist takes tar from the eponymous pits to create heliographs of fossilized animal remains. —Z.L.

Yossi Milo Gallery, 245 Tenth Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m. 
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New York-based artist MeLo-X will exhibit new work documenting a 2012 trip to Equatorial Guinea. —Michael H. Miller

Sean Kelly Gallery, 475 Tenth Avenue, New York, 6–8 p.m.
Reed Anderson will have his fourth solo show at the gallery. —M.H.M.

Pierogi Gallery, 177 North Ninth Street, Brooklyn, 7–9 p.m.
You may have seen Ellie Ga’s performance at the New Museum last year, the one about her five-month stay onboard a research sailboat drifting near the North Pole (I hope you did, it was really great, but maybe you didn’t because it was only one night). This show, her second at Bureau, is up for a whole month. It centers around a lighthouse built in the 3rd century B.C. on a small island off the coast of Alexandria. Expect another nuanced, research-saturated project dealing with language, memory, exploration and time. —Z.L.

Bureau, 178 Norfolk Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
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Carter will have his first show at Lisa Cooley. —M.H.M

Lisa Cooley, 107 Norfolk Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

MONDAY, MARCH 17

Screening: The Third Man at MoMA
Need reasons to go see this movie? Well, there’s Orson Welles as the villainous Harry Lime, some pretty striking expressionist cinematography, that quote about cuckoo clocks (courtesy Graham Greene’s screenplay), and it’s all set in shady postwar Vienna! How’s that for starters? —Zoë Lescaze
The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, 8 p.m., $12, free for members

THURSDAY, MARCH 20

Opening: “Ben Gocker: Scaredy Cat City” at P.P.O.W.
Ben Gocker, who is based in Queens and works as a librarian at the Brooklyn Public Library, returns to P.P.O.W. for his sophomore show, which features new large-scale, intimate assemblages and modestly scaled drawings that incorporate books and maps that have been been deaccessioned by his place of employment. From the release: “…the works constitute a new approach to narrative and poetic space, establishing a kind of shades-down dream cartography of wherever or whatever ‘Scaredy Cat City’ is.” Should be a barnburner. —A.R.
P.P.O.W., 535 West 22nd Street, Third Floor, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: “Romare Bearden: Insight and Innovation” at DC Moore
DC Moore offers up a selection of work by the one and only Romare Bearden, including a large 1981 autobiographical collage that refers back to a gouache from exactly 40 years earlier. —A.R.
DC Moore Gallery, 535 West 22nd Street, Second Floor, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: “Esther Kläs: Palomar” at Peter Blum
The wily German-born artist Esther Kläs, whose rough-hewn geometric sculptures often like they have mysterious architectural functions—if only you could figure them out!—presents her second show at the gallery. —A.R.
Peter Blum, 20 West 57th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: “Matthew Brandt: Excavations” at Yossi Milo Gallery
Matthew Brandt is presenting some pretty process-driven photography projects, all dealing in different ways with the past, for his second show at the gallery. In his “Dust” series, Mr. Brandt combines historic photographs of New York buildings (and their demolitions) with dust from their original locations, using the latter “as pigment in a handmade gum-bichromate emulsion.” In the “La Brea” series, the artist takes tar from the eponymous pits to create heliographs of fossilized animal remains. —Z.L.
Yossi Milo Gallery, 245 Tenth Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m. 

Opening: “MeLo-X: A Movement in Africa” at Sean Kelly
New York-based artist MeLo-X will exhibit new work documenting a 2012 trip to Equatorial Guinea. —Michael H. Miller
Sean Kelly Gallery, 475 Tenth Avenue, New York, 6–8 p.m.

FRIDAY, MARCH 21

Opening: “Reed Anderson: The Way You Look Is the Way I Feel” at Pierogi
Reed Anderson will have his fourth solo show at the gallery. —M.H.M.
Pierogi Gallery, 177 North Ninth Street, Brooklyn, 7–9 p.m.

SUNDAY, MARCH 23

Opening: “Ellie Ga: Four Thousand Blocks” at Bureau
You may have seen Ellie Ga’s performance at the New Museum last year, the one about her five-month stay onboard a research sailboat drifting near the North Pole (I hope you did, it was really great, but maybe you didn’t because it was only one night). This show, her second at Bureau, is up for a whole month. It centers around a lighthouse built in the 3rd century B.C. on a small island off the coast of Alexandria. Expect another nuanced, research-saturated project dealing with language, memory, exploration and time. —Z.L.
Bureau, 178 Norfolk Street, New York, 6–8 p.m. 

Opening: “Carter: Beside Myself” at Lisa Cooley
Carter will have his first show at Lisa Cooley. —M.H.M
Lisa Cooley, 107 Norfolk Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

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