10 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before April 20

  • THURSDAY, APRIL 17

    Opening: Sherrie Levine at Paula Cooper
    New Levine! You excited? I am. —Dan Duray
    Paula Cooper Gallery, 534 West 21st Street, New York, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

    Opening: Julian Schnabel at Gagosian
    Always curious to see what this guy does next. —D.D.
    Gagosian Gallery, 555 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: “Chez Perv” at Team Gallery
    Team Gallery presents an exhibition featuring Gardar Eide Einarsson, Matias Faldbakken and Oscar Tuazon, the name of which is taken from a New York Post headline about the Dominique Strauss-Kahn sex scandal. —Michael H. Miller
    Team Gallery, 47 Wooster Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    Opening: “The New Romantics” at Eyebeam
    This new exhibition will look at “the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism … Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution.” A night of performances will go down on April 25. —Zoë Lescaze
    Eyebeam, 540 West 21st Street, New York, 7-9 p.m.

    Opening: “Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: equinimod & costumes” at 303 Gallery
    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster’s first show at 303 (and first in a New York gallery) will feature the artist’s personal wardrobe. —M.H.M.
    303 Gallery, 507 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

    FRIDAY, APRIL 18

    Opening: “Marie Lorenz: The Valley of Dry Bones” at Jack Hanley Gallery
    For her third show at the gallery, the venturesome Marie Lorenz will premiere a new five-channel video called Ezekia, which “tells the story of a group of women exploring the shore of a lost city.” Should be a great one. —Andrew Russeth

    Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

    SATURDAY, APRIL 19

    Opening: “D’Ette Nogle: Michael Clifton & Michael Benevento and D´Ette Nogle Present: Regressing to Mean” at Clifton Benevento
    The always intriguing Los Angeles-based artist D’Ette Nogle stages her second show at Clifton Benevento. Is it timed to Frieze New York? Maybe in part, but there are even greater forces at work: an explanation, from the news release: “Spring standardized testing season is upon us. As many students across the nation are being assessed under new corporatized and computerized testing systems aligned with the Common Core State Standards, Clifton Benevento offers a more traditional more-than-one-choice, fill-in-the-bubbles, take-your-best-guess testing exercise.” —A.R.
    Clifton Benevento, 515 Broadway, New York, 5–7 p.m.

    Opening: Tunga at Luhring Augustine
    “Tunga’s new ink drawings made on diaphanous handmade paper address similar concerns as those developed in his sculptures; each features a continuous line, linking disparate bodily forms that overlap to create larger anthropomorphic images, which emerge and recede,” reads the press release. A must-see for fans of linking disparate bodily forms. —D.D.
    Luhring Augustine, 531 West 24th Street, New York, 5–7 p.m.

    Opening: Rainer Ganahl at Kai Matsumiya
    The indefatigable Rainer Ganahl will show a film and photographs of the remarkable classical-music concert that he staged at the El Mundo department store in East Harlem in early 2013. This also marks the debut of this new gallery, which is opening in a former clothing shop that features a tag by Wu-Tang Clan producer Mathematics. Pretty cool.  —A.R.
    Kai Matsumiya, 153 ½ Stanton Street, New York, 7–9:30 p.m.

    Talk: “These Things Called Exhibitions” at the New Museum
    Seven speakers will examine artist-organized exhibitions over the course of a day-long symposium. Curator Florence Ostende (who is giving a talk with artist Franz Erhard Walther on Friday at the Drawing Center) and fellow organizers Johanna Burton and Alicia Ritson have arranged the following line up: Juli Carson on Yael Bartana, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Stephen Prina, Alex Kitnick on Noah Purifoy, Kevin Lotery on Richard Hamilton, Monika Szewczyk on Mickalene Thomas and Mina Totino, Eve Meltzer on Mary Kelly, and a keynote lecture from Jan Verwoert. —Z.L.
    New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 1-6 p.m., $10 (members $8)

  • New Levine! You excited? I am. —Dan Duray
    Paula Cooper Gallery, 534 West 21st Street, New York, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

  • Always curious to see what this guy does next. —D.D.
    Gagosian Gallery, 555 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • Team Gallery presents an exhibition featuring Gardar Eide Einarsson, Matias Faldbakken and Oscar Tuazon, the name of which is taken from a New York Post headline about the Dominique Strauss-Kahn sex scandal. —Michael H. Miller
    Team Gallery, 47 Wooster Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • This new exhibition will look at "the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism … Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution.” A night of performances will go down on April 25. —Zoë Lescaze
    Eyebeam, 540 West 21st Street, New York, 7-9 p.m.

  • Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster's first show at 303 (and first in a New York gallery) will feature the artist's personal wardrobe. —M.H.M.
    303 Gallery, 507 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

  • For her third show at the gallery, the venturesome Marie Lorenz will premiere a new five-channel video called Ezekia, which “tells the story of a group of women exploring the shore of a lost city.” Should be a great one. —Andrew Russeth Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

  • The always intriguing Los Angeles-based artist D’Ette Nogle stages her second show at Clifton Benevento. Is it timed to Frieze New York? Maybe in part, but there are even greater forces at work: an explanation, from the news release: “Spring standardized testing season is upon us. As many students across the nation are being assessed under new corporatized and computerized testing systems aligned with the Common Core State Standards, Clifton Benevento offers a more traditional more-than-one-choice, fill-in-the-bubbles, take-your-best-guess testing exercise.” —A.R.
    Clifton Benevento, 515 Broadway, New York, 5–7 p.m.

  • "Tunga’s new ink drawings made on diaphanous handmade paper address similar concerns as those developed in his sculptures; each features a continuous line, linking disparate bodily forms that overlap to create larger anthropomorphic images, which emerge and recede," reads the press release. A must-see for fans of linking disparate bodily forms. —D.D.
    Luhring Augustine, 531 West 24th Street, New York, 5–7 p.m.

  • The indefatigable Rainer Ganahl will show a film and photographs of the remarkable classical-music concert that he staged at the El Mundo department store in East Harlem in early 2013. This also marks the debut of this new gallery, which is opening in a former clothing shop that features a tag by Wu-Tang Clan producer Mathematics. Pretty cool. —A.R.
    Kai Matsumiya, 153 ½ Stanton Street, New York, 7–9:30 p.m.

  • Seven speakers will examine artist-organized exhibitions over the course of a day-long symposium. Curator Florence Ostende (who is giving a talk with artist Franz Erhard Walther on Friday at the Drawing Center) and fellow organizers Johanna Burton and Alicia Ritson have arranged the following line up: Juli Carson on Yael Bartana, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Stephen Prina, Alex Kitnick on Noah Purifoy, Kevin Lotery on Richard Hamilton, Monika Szewczyk on Mickalene Thomas and Mina Totino, Eve Meltzer on Mary Kelly, and a keynote lecture from Jan Verwoert. —Z.L.
    New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 1-6 p.m., $10/$8 members

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