13 Things to Do in New York's Art World Before May 4

Choice selections from index magazine (1996–2006) have been compiled into what is no doubt a rich and handsome volume by Rizzoli. The tome includes “interviews with founders Peter Halley and Bob Nickas, a reminiscence by Bruce LaBruce, and a historical overview by Wendy Vogel.” Sounds like this will be one nice celebration. —Andrew Russeth
Karma, 39 Great Jones Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
The fact is, lectures just don’t get much better than those in Dia’s Artists on Artists lecture series. This edition has the wily Jonathan Monk discussing the redoubtable and endlessly fascinating Alighiero e Boetti (1940–94). What’s not to like? (Pictured in the slide show is Boetti's Mappa (Map), of 1972.)—A.R.
Dia:Chelsea, 535 West 22nd Street, Fifth Floor, New York, 6:30 p.m., $6/$3
Peter Coffin's new book pp., contains photographs that "foster an engagement inspired by freed associations in contrast to the tradition of conceptual photography, which tends to establish prescribed interpretations and fixed meanings. Here photographs of prismatic light, geometric diagrams, Goethe's color theory charts, travel porn, and tropical drinks are documented—shot from a copy stand and reproduced at 1:1 scale—but sourced without the fuss of expressivity from the act of reproduction itself. Nothing is clearly told or concealed in Coffin's images, no particular things are demonstrated. However; in recognizing the work's designed ambiguity, we are prompted to look afresh at the world." sounds worth checking out! —Dan Duray
Dashwood Books, 33 Bond Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
I've never quite understood the mania for Mark Grotjahn's "Butterfly" paintings—they're pleasant fun, but so are a lot of tight, energetic, process-y abstract paintings that have been made this century, so why get so excited about these? That said, this sounds like a choice opportunity to take another look. Douglas Fogle is helming this survey of iconic works dating from 2001 to 2008 in Blum & Poe's new space on the Upper East Side. (Pictured in the slide show is Untitled (Red Butterfly III Yellow MARK GROTJAHN P-08 Filled in M 3 753), of 2008.) —A.R.
Blum & Poe, 19 East 66th Street, New York, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.
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New paintings from a terrific artist. Can't wait! —D.D.
Paul Kasmin Gallery, 293 Tenth Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m.
Blockbuster alert! Hot on the heels of the Whitney’s illuminating 2013 Jay DeFeo (1929–89) retrospective, MIN is showing work from 1965 through the end of her life. Forty-eight total pieces, folks: collage, painting, photography, photocopying(!) and more. Not to be missed. (Pictured in the slide show is 1972's White Shadow.) —A.R.
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.
For his fourth solo exhibition at the gallery, Fred Tomaselli will present nine new paintings and 20 works from his New York Times collage series. —M.H. Miller
James Cohan Gallery, 533 West 26th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
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The prominent South Korean artist shows new work and a large-scale installation. Check it out! —D.D.
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
The three artists will be exhibited simultaneously, which will include Mr. Leckey making 3D prints of his own works in the gallery. —M.H.M.
Gavin Brown's Enterprise, 620 Greenwich Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
More than 30 works on paper, most of which are made with watercolor, will be on view. —M.H.M.
Pace Gallery, 32 East 57th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
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Ben Schumacher is organizing a group show in the gallery’s raw pop-up space at the corner of 11th Avenue. The show’s mouthful of a name comes from “the meeting place of a group of hackers in Minnesota, organized via the website 2600.com.” Neat. (Pictured is a work by Mr. Schumacher.) —Z.L.
Bortolami (temporary), 547 West 20th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
It’s time for Rhizome’s fifth annual techie-art symposium, which pairs Silicon Valley types with contemporary artists, asking each team to invent something (particularly curious to see what Frances Stark and Snapchat’s David Kravitz come up with). The day of talks is sold out, but you can livestream the event and check out the after party from 6-9 p.m. (tickets are $20). —Z.L.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

MONDAY, APRIL 28

Book Launch: index A to Z at Karma
Choice selections from index magazine (1996–2006) have been compiled into what is no doubt a rich and handsome volume by Rizzoli. The tome includes “interviews with founders Peter Halley and Bob Nickas, a reminiscence by Bruce LaBruce, and a historical overview by Wendy Vogel.” Sounds like this will be one nice celebration. —Andrew Russeth
Karma, 39 Great Jones Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Talk: Jonathan Monk on Alighiero e Boetti at Dia
The fact is, lectures just don’t get much better than those in Dia’s Artists on Artists lecture series. This edition has the wily Jonathan Monk discussing the redoubtable and endlessly fascinating Alighiero e Boetti (1940–94). What’s not to like? (Pictured in the slide show is Boetti’s Mappa (Map), of 1972.)—A.R.
Dia:Chelsea, 535 West 22nd Street, Fifth Floor, New York, 6:30 p.m., $6/$3

TUESDAY, APRIL 29

Book Signing: Peter Coffin at Dashwood Books
Peter Coffin’s new book pp., contains photographs that “foster an engagement inspired by freed associations in contrast to the tradition of conceptual photography, which tends to establish prescribed interpretations and fixed meanings. Here photographs of prismatic light, geometric diagrams, Goethe’s color theory charts, travel porn, and tropical drinks are documented—shot from a copy stand and reproduced at 1:1 scale—but sourced without the fuss of expressivity from the act of reproduction itself. Nothing is clearly told or concealed in Coffin’s images, no particular things are demonstrated. However; in recognizing the work’s designed ambiguity, we are prompted to look afresh at the world.” sounds worth checking out! —Dan Duray
Dashwood Books, 33 Bond Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

THURSDAY, MAY 1

Opening: “Mark Grotjahn: Butterfly Paintings” at Blum & Poe
I’ve never quite understood the mania for Mark Grotjahn’s “Butterfly” paintings—they’re pleasant fun, but so are a lot of tight, energetic, process-y abstract paintings that have been made this century, so why get so excited about these? That said, this sounds like a choice opportunity to take another look. Douglas Fogle is helming this survey of iconic works dating from 2001 to 2008 in Blum & Poe’s new space on the Upper East Side. (Pictured in the slide show is Untitled (Red Butterfly III Yellow MARK GROTJAHN P-08 Filled in M 3 753), of 2008.)  —A.R.
Blum & Poe, 19 East 66th Street, New York, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: Walton Ford, “Watercolors” at Paul Kasmin Gallery
New paintings from a terrific artist. Can’t wait! —D.D.
Paul Kasmin Gallery, 293 Tenth Avenue, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Jay DeFeo at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Blockbuster alert! Hot on the heels of the Whitney’s illuminating 2013 Jay DeFeo (1929–89) retrospective, MIN is showing work from 1965 through the end of her life. Forty-eight total pieces, folks: collage, painting, photography, photocopying(!) and more. Not to be missed. (Pictured in the slide show is 1972’s White Shadow.) —A.R.
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th Street, New York, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Fred Tomaselli, “Current Events” at James Cohan
For his fourth solo exhibition at the gallery, Fred Tomaselli will present nine new paintings and 20 works from his New York Times collage series. —M.H. Miller
James Cohan Gallery, 533 West 26th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Mark Rothko, “Works on Paper 1941-1947” at Pace Gallery
More than 30 works on paper, most of which are made with watercolor, will be on view. —M.H.M.
Pace Gallery, 32 East 57th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

FRIDAY, MAY 2

Opening: Lee Bul at Lehmann Maupin
The prominent South Korean artist shows new work and a large-scale installation. Check it out! —D.D.
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Kerstin Brätsch, Mark Handforth, Mark Leckey at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise
The three artists will be exhibited simultaneously, which will include Mr. Leckey making 3D prints of his own works in the gallery. —M.H.M.
Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, 620 Greenwich Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: Tim Barber, “Relations” at Capricious 88
Tim Barber, whose personal and fashion photography both frequently possess a lovely, offhand intimacy, is presenting new work on the Lower East Side. (Pictured is an older photograph by Mr. Barber.) —Zoë Lescaze
Capricious 88, 88 Eldridge Street, 5th Floor, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: “Bloomington: Mall of America, North Side of Food Court, Across From Burger King & The Bank of Payphones That Don’t Take Incoming Calls” at Bortolami
Ben Schumacher (whose work is pictured here) is organizing a group show in the gallery’s raw pop-up space at the corner of 11th Avenue. The show’s mouthful of a name comes from “the meeting place of a group of hackers in Minnesota, organized via the website 2600.com.” Neat. —Z.L.
Bortolami (temporary), 547 West 20th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 3

Conference: Rhizome Presents “Seven on Seven” at the New Museum
It’s time for Rhizome’s fifth annual techie-art symposium, which pairs Silicon Valley types with contemporary artists, asking each team to invent something (particularly curious to see what Frances Stark and Snapchat’s David Kravitz come up with). The day of talks is sold out, but you can livestream the event and check out the after party from 6-9 p.m. (tickets are $20). —Z.L.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

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