Ken Burns Brooklyn: Historian Buys in Prospect Heights for $2.75 M.

Ken and Julie Burns, with Uma Thurman, center. (Patrick McMullan)

Ken and Julie Burns, with Uma Thurman, center. (Patrick McMullan)

A Brooklyn boy by birth, documentary filmmaker Ken Burns made an apt breakthrough in 1981 with his Oscar-nominated adaptation of David McCullough’s The Great Bridge, about the construction of Brooklyn Bridge. (Mr. Burns titled his film simply Brooklyn Bridge.) Today a primary resident of New Hampshire, he and his wife Julie have lately pitched in for a place in Prospect Heights for his daughter Lilly and her fiancé Tony Hernandez—whose tastes do not seem to have been influenced by Mr. Burns’ love of history. The pair are headed for Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Meier’s Prospect Heights creation 1 Grand Army Plaza—a sleek, Manhattan-flavored condo building. A swell family the young Lilly Burns has; she, her father and his wife have just collectively dropped $2.75 million on a three-bedroom pad, according to city records. Kristina Leonetti, of Corcoran, had the listing.  

The 2,107 square-foot apartment faces west, with floor-to-ceiling glass for sunset views of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Arch. (Perhaps we spoke too soon about history’s effect on the Burns’ real estate decisions?) There are walnut built-ins and plenty of light, an open kitchen with Corian cabinetry and fancy appliances. Above is a shared roof deck with the obligatory “jaw-dropping” views, and next door, an Olympic swimming pool, in the event that the eminent historian wants to drop by for a few laps. And that home office will probably come in handy from time to time, too. Not to mention the easy walking distance to the museum and library.

How arch.

How arch.

Brooklyn, of course—at least certain portions of Brooklyn—is increasingly becoming the preserve of investment bankers. But sellers Edward and Kathryn Kovalik were a bit ahead of the curve, picking up the Grand Army Plaza condo in 2011 for $1.73 million. The recent sale gives the couple a nice $1 million profit to dedicate to their next home, but Mr. Kovalik, the founder, CEO and managing partner of the KLR Group, an investment bank specializing in energy, was likely not terribly desperate for an infusion. Last month, he was appointed to the board of the Marathon Patent Group, his second corporate board position. He’s becoming so darn important, he might just have to move to Manhattan!

Then again, maybe not.     

ken burns 2 Ken Burns Brooklyn: Historian Buys in Prospect Heights for $2.75 M.

Seats at the table.