Bill de Blasio Wants City’s Minimum Wage Beyond $10.10

Mayor Bill de Blasio. (Photo: NYC Mayor's Office)

Mayor Bill de Blasio. (Photo: NYC Mayor’s Office)

The $10.10 minimum wage is just the beginning for Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Mr. de Blasio told reporters in Manhattan today that he is fully behind Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan to raise the state’s minimum wage to $10.10 next year and give localities additional wage hike leeway, hinting that he would like to see the wage eventually soar beyond the initial proposal.

“What I want to focus on is getting the bill passed because that will automatically take us to $10.10 which is the standard President Obama rightly proposed for the country–we need it here in New York City,” Mr. de Blasio said after an unrelated press conference.

“We will then have a process working with all the stakeholders in the city to determine where we want to go beyond that. I am certain we want to go beyond that but I don’t know exactly what that dollar figure is,” he added.

In the wake of securing the Working Families Party endorsement this weekend, Mr. Cuomo has backed a plan to give localities like New York City the ability to raise their minimum wage up to 30 percent beyond the state standard. Republicans who partially control the State Senate with the Independent Democratic Conference have resisted these calls before, but both Mr. Cuomo and Mr. de Blasio have said they would fight for the Democratic takeover of the State Senate.

Any minimum wage legislation would be passed next year since the state legislature’s session is winding down. It’s also not yet clear if the votes exist to make the wage hike a reality in 2015.

But Mr. de Blasio was excited about the possibility, heralding it as a “historic moment.” President Barack Obama is calling for $10.10 federal minimum wage already.

“We’ve talked a lot about how much people are suffering and how difficult it is to make ends meet in this city,” the mayor said. “Getting to $10.10 immediately in the next session in 2015, next year, and then giving localities the ability go farther is a huge step forward, a historic step forward.”