Midday Media Mix: #SummerFridays

#SummerFridays

#SummerFridays (Instagram)

The New York Post managed to find the most annoying guy in the world.  Matthew Owens, a 27-year-old publicist for Express, doesn’t just enjoy the perk of Summer Fridays. He really enjoys taunting all his banker friends with the fact that he gets off early on Fridays. “I remind them that I will be taking an early train out to the Hamptons. And I send them a later schedule to remind them they will be taking a late train out. And that they can find me at a restaurant out east, where I will be enjoying a glass of rosé,” Mr. Owens told the Post, with what is described as a sinister cackle. But it isn’t just Mr. Owens’ friends that don’t like summer Fridays. Some employers see it as a waste of time. The Post then did a round-up of companies that offer the summer schedule, somehow excluding the entire book publishing industry. But whatever. Mr. Owens is almost done for the day and will be in the Hamptons soon, sipping rosé and losing friends. (New York Post)

Ann Friedman wonders why we treat PR as a pink ghetto. “While there are many men in PR — including 80 percent of upper management — it’s women, often young women, who are likely to be doing the grunt work of sending emails and writing tweets and cold-calling contacts. The very work that journalists, and the rest of us, are likely to see as fluffy,” she writes. (New York)

Amazon unveils Kindle Unlimited, which is as many e-book downloads as a reader can read for just $10 a month. It’s like Netflix, but for books. The catch? Well, the titles aren’t particularly highbrow. Also, it’s Amazon, so it might not be great for authors and publishers in the long term. (On the Media)

Speaking of unlimited deals, Gawker’s Caity Weaver tested the limits of TGI Friday’s newest promotion deal: Endless Appetizers. Turns out, there are no limits. It’s like Netflix, but for mozzarella sticks! (Gawker)

In an opinion piece on CNN’s website, political commenter Paul Begala mistakenly wrote that The Washington Post owns Vox. It doesn’t, but Vox’s Ezra Klein used to almost own The Washington Post, so that most likely explains the confusion. But does it explain it enough? We await Vox’s explainer. (CNN.com, h/t Jim Romensko)

Rupert Murdoch is tweeting again. After tweeting to apologize for not tweeting (he’s “been busy lately with many preoccupations!”), he informed his followers that due to pesky “cross-ownership laws from another age,” he can’t “buy Trib group or LA Times.” But now, he is finally kicking back with some Australian wildlife: