Business as Usual: White Shoe Lawyer Trades Park Avenue Co-op to Banker for $7.9M

A bit of confectionery in the dining room.

A bit of confectionery in the dining room.

As far as we know, Rembrandt never painted any portraits of smug young Harvard athletes. But if in fact the Dutch master did dash off such a piece, we’re fairly sure that the Sullivan & Cromwell attorney Benjamin F. Stapleton III managed to get a hold of it, and install it above the mantel in one of the four bedrooms at the 925 Park Avenue co-op that he recently sold for $7.9 million, according to city records. Thankfully for the buyers, Reis and Stefanie Alfond, Mr. Stapleton will most certainly be leaving the mantel in place—and, perhaps even more importantly, taking the vaguely-unsettling painting with him.

A corner duplex facing the Park, in a much sought-after 1907 limestone building designed by Delano and Aldrich, the apartment, which was listed with Diane Johnson and Scott Boyd at Douglas Elliman, occupies the “rarely available ‘B’ line.” (This, of course, being the building’s “most coveted” longitude.) Things inside are traditional and rather formal, but without being too stuffy about it. High, beamed ceilings can be found nearly throughout, which makes for particularly attractive presentation on the lower level, where capacious living and dining rooms stand side-by-side off an entry gallery and near the sizable library and not-terribly-large kitchen.

The athlete's shrine.

The athlete’s shrine.

“Convenient access to the second floor” takes the form of a staircase close to the kitchen—convenient, one assumes, especially for staff bearing midnight snacks—and the second floor provides ample private space, with its quad of bedrooms plus an additional chamber for the help. Mr. Alfond is a partner at the investment firm Union Capital, which has its office just a mile or so south on Park, so he can easily walk to work. At least until the coming of the next Polar Vortex, of course.

Elementary, my dear Watson.

Elementary, my dear Watson.