Time Inc. Names Branded Content Vet Nathan Lump Editor of Travel + Leisure

Nathan Lump

Nathan Lump (photo: Time Inc)

Nathan Lump is taking over as editor of Travel + Leisure, parent company Time Inc. announced this afternoon. Mr. Lump will replace Nancy Novogrod, who announced that she was stepping down from the travel magazine, where she had spent two decades, early last month.

“It is an honor to follow in the footsteps of Nancy Novogrod, one of my career mentors, to lead this dynamic global brand at what I believe is the most exciting moment in its 43-year history,” Mr. Lump said in an announcement that went out this afternoon. “I am looking forward to building on T+L’s strength as the best source of intelligent, forward-looking travel information and inspiration, by developing new and ever more engaging ways for us to reach and serve the world’s most discerning travelers.”

Mr. Lump has been Condé Nast’s director of branded content since January and prior to that was the digital director of Condé Nast Traveler. Before going over to Condé in 2012, Mr. Lump led content strategy at marketing and communications firms JWT and Hill Holliday. This isn’t Mr. Lump’s first time at Travel + Leisure: he held several editorial positions at the travel title in the early 2000s.

When Time Inc. was spun off from Time Warner in June, top brass touted its aim of beefing up its video and live events department, as well a stronger focus on incorporating branded content and native advertising into its editorial offerings, a goal that is being emphasized in hiring Mr. Lump.

“Nathan’s deep digital knowledge and vast editorial expertise make him the ideal choice to further Travel + Leisures stature as a powerful multi-platform brand serving customers in print, digital, mobile, video, and events,” Time Inc. executive vice president Evelyn Webster said in the announcement.

Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp took some heat for remarks that he made in a video interview back in June about dismantling the so-called separation of church and state that has long been seen as sacrosanct in the media world (the video even sparked John Oliver’s 11-minute monologue about native advertising). But then again, if there is any type of title that historically straddled the line between the editorial and the advertising sides, it’s probably a luxury travel magazine.