On the Market: The Return of Bike Wars?

Ed Yourdon/flickr.

Ed Yourdon/flickr.

Police have seized 1,000 illegal dollar vans since last year, DNAInfo reports, but after the vans are confiscated, many drivers pay the $2,000 fine (often reduced) and go on driving.

With less illegal dollar vans on the road, maybe we should all take up biking instead? Not if the New York Post has anything to say about it! Nicole Gelinas pens a measured and reasonable call from police officers to crack down on the cycling scofflaws in Central Park, pointing out that death by bicycle is rare (hence all the media attention on the most recent death) and that most cyclists obey the law. But the Post couldn’t resist some editorializing of its own, titling the piece: “New York’s Cycles of Death: Our Arrogant Biker Nightmare.”

DOT commissioner Polly Trottenberg agrees that Central Park needs more and better bike enforcement, according to Capital New York. The Park is more crowded than ever before, making it more difficult for cyclists to train in the park… and may ultimately mean that it’s not a great place for someone who needs to bike very, very fast. Maybe it’s time to revive the plan for a Brooklyn velodrome?

In other transit news, The Wall Street Journal reports that diplomats from over 180 countries owe $16 million in unpaid parking tickets. No wonder no one likes diplomats!

But enough conflict. How about the fact that everyone loves the High Line’s last brawny, rugged leg. Curbed surveys reviews, comments and tweets declare the final stretch playful but not precious, tough but inviting.

Back to conflict: a state official tells Capital New York that expectations to save the Fortis Group’s proposal are low following NYU Langone’s announcement on Friday that it was backing out of the deal because staying in would mean entering a labor conflict with the New York State Nurses’ Association.

DNAInfo continues to investigate public officials penning letters on behalf of organizations and companies who, in the case of Letitia James, donate money to their campaigns, or as the website writes about today, employ their relatives. The website reveals that councilmember Maria del Carmen Arroyo and former councilmember Diana Reyna both wrote to the Department of Housing Preservation and Development on behalf of organizations where their family members work.

Do you have to continue living with a roommate who has effectively become a ghost, isolating herself in her room and leaving very little trace of her presence save for some seriously passive aggressive vibes? Gothamist says no… so long as she’s not on the lease or you don’t mind moving. But considering the crazies you could be living with, it might not be such a bad idea.

What can we expect of the real estate market this fall? Brick Underground asks the experts who say high but stable rents, high but not crazy high sales prices and the unfortunate continuation of the all-cash buying trend.

On the Market: The Return of Bike Wars?