On the Market: Poor Doors Are Panned, But Public Is Largely O.K. With Poor Buildings

118 W. 76th.

118 W. 76th.

Poor doors get panned, poor buildings on the other hand… Crain’s reports that while the public and politicians have turned on designs that force affordable housing tenants to enter through separate entrances, they’re largely fine with entirely separate buildings. Inequality in close proximity, it would seem, is much more objectionable than proximity with distance.

The decaying brownstone on W. 76th that has irritated neighbors for decades has finally sold to a developer, The Wall Street Journal reports. And lest you harbored any hopes of someday finding a real fixer-upper you could actually afford on the Upper West Side, this ought to dash them: the developer paid $6.6 million. The owner, meanwhile, made a  small fortune, having paid a mere $5,000 in 1976 and spent quite apparently, very little on maintenance in the years since. The developer plans to restore the home to a single-family mansion.

To further depress those of you who are not “relatively young, hetero, professional male bachelor who grew up in America or have been living here for quite some time” or a “9 hot lipstick lesbian with bi tendencies,” Gothamist has unearthed the bro-iest apartment listing in New York city, where some rad players are looking for a thirty-something roommate who will pay $2,000 a month to live with them in a Long Island City apartment share. Because there’s nothing that says success like sharing an apartment in Long Island City with a bunch of other 30-something men.

Speaking of shared living arrangements: living on campus might be a fundamental part of a college experience, and an important factor in helping students stay in school, but it’s also a luxury, and one that not all college students can afford, The Atlantic Cities notes.

Luciano Pavarotti’s Central Park South pied-a-terre is asking $13.7 million, Curbed reports. What’s more, the late opera singer’s widow says that the two bedroom was Pavarotti’s favorite and it appears to have been meticulously maintained as well.

The city’s public housing not so much. The New York Times writes that a new study from the comptroller’s office reveals that from 2005 to 2011, the number of broken or missing windows in NYCHA buildings increased 945 percent, with NYCHA buildings three times more likely than other buildings to have broken windows.

At least Brooklyn’s Coney Island Houses are slated to get $108 million in federal aid for Sandy repairs, according to Crain’s.

Last of all, corner-consuming coffee behemoth Starbucks is planning to tweak its one-size-fits-all locations, opening both smaller, express shops and larger cafes oriented to tastings and roasting, reports Bloomberg.

On the Market: Poor Doors Are Panned, But Public Is Largely O.K. With Poor Buildings