Where Everyone Knows Your Name: ‘Cheers’ Creator Nabs Fifth Ave. Co-op for $4.2M

Deborah and James Burrows. (Patrick McMullan)

Deborah and James Burrows. (Patrick McMullan)

In New York’s current real estate climate, a television series set in a thriving, unpretentious neighborhood bar where folks from all walks mix and mingle and gobble beer nuts with their suds–where regulars are familiar with the details of one another’s family lives and share good-natured inside jokes–would seem to most of us nearly as unrealistic as, well, Friends. But then, verisimilitude has never been the currency of the sitcom. And anyway, wasn’t Cheers set in Boston? (We won’t delve here into the relative believability of the aforementioned friendliness among the constitutionally surly Boston set.)

In any event, James Burrows,  a director and co-creator of Cheers, together with his wife, Deborah, has just dropped $4.2 million on a one-bedroom co-op at 1 Fifth Avenue, according to city records. More than $4 million for a four-room apartment in Greenwich Village, you say? Why, that’s more than $1 million a room! Now that’s more realistic.

Still, Mr. Burrows, who’s also known for his work on Will and Grace and Taxi, did manage a slight discount on the place, which was listed for $4.35 million with Ann Weintraub. The seller, Ronald Levandusky, is a plastic surgeon, whose ownership of the unit predates the city’s tracking system, so it’s unclear how much he paid for it initially, but it’s unlikely that the price reduction caused him too much pain.

Looks like spring.

Looks like spring.

The apartment itself sits up high in the building, a well-regarded prewar affair with a landmark designation. From the south side of the co-op, on the 26th floor, the views of Washington Square Park are tremendous, and those to the northeast and west aren’t half-bad, either. There’s an open, serviceable-looking kitchen and a corner living room with big picture windows and inlaid wood floors. There’s even a landline in the master bath!

A nice, quiet neighborhood bar? Well, surely, there must be a few that the NYU kids haven’t found yet.

Three cheers.

Three cheers.