Playtime at the Frieze Fair, as Artworks Confound and Delight

The little dog laughed (2014). Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 270 cm x 840 cm. (Photo Courtesy of Blum & Poe and the artist)

The little dog laughed, 2014. Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 270 cm x 840 cm.
(Photo Courtesy of Blum & Poe and the artist)

Frieze New York, which opens on Randall’s Island today to VIP collectors, is one of the country’s biggest art fairs. But is it also FUN?

Curator Cecilia Alemani is doing her part to make is so, by selecting five young artists—Pia Camil, Samara Golden, Aki Sasamoto, Korakrit Arunanondchai and Allyson Viera—to create intimate hideouts, portable artworks and intricate mazes for this year’s program.

A non-profit section of the fair, Frieze Projects commissions new, adventurous artworks and performances for inside the fair tent and around Randall’s Park Island.

“Frieze Projects is an opportunity for artists to create new site-specific works that complete, enrich and at times disrupt the regular rhythm of the fair,” Frieze Projects curator Cecilia Alemani told the Observer.

Samara Golden. Bad Brains, Frieze Fair NY, 2012. Live video installation with sound. Rmax, paint, mirror, ribbon, found objects Dimensions variable. (Photo courtesy of the artist)

Samara Golden. Bad Brains, Frieze Fair NY, 2012. Live video installation with sound. Rmax, paint, mirror, ribbon, found objects. Dimensions variable. (Photo courtesy of the artist)

Mexican artist Pia Camil is producing and distributing 800 wearable pieces of art, which are free for the asking! Inspired by Helio Oiticica’s Parangole, a series of fabric works meant to be worn as “habitable” paintings, Camil’s unique Watching-wearing outfits are made from fabric leftovers and remnants. Sported by fair spectators, they should a colorful, mobile artwork.

Samara Golden, a Los Angeles-based artist, is building a secret room underneath the tent that will only be visible from the outside. Using mirrors, the artist will provide a view that goes deep to reveal a sculptural underground. Golden has a similarly immersive installation, which explores what she calls the sixth dimension, currently on view at MoMA PS1.

Frieze Labyrinth Sketch

Fluxus-Labyrinth Sketch.

Following a tradition at Frieze New York, Frieze Projects also features a tribute to an alternative space or an artist-run project that has changed our perception of contemporary art. This edition offers Flux-Labyrinth, a homage to Fluxus-leader George Maciunas’ collaborative environment, which was first presented in Berlin in 1976.

A group of international artists, including Amalia Pica, John Bock and the collective Gelitin, are constructing a 200-foot-long maze of narrow corridors and rooms, where viewers will have to overcome absurd obstacles and obstructions to reach a joyful end.

“These type of interactive projects offer a different experience to the visitors,” said Ms. Alemani. “It’s not only about looking and browsing, but it’s also about participating in a direct way.”

Playtime at the Frieze Fair, as Artworks Confound and Delight