Rare Photographs of Frida Kahlo on Display at Throckmorton

A rare photo of Frida Kahlo shot in 1933 by Lucienne Bloch (Photo: Throckmorton Fine Art)

A rare photo of Frida Kahlo shot in 1933 by Lucienne Bloch (Photo: Throckmorton Fine Art)

Frida Kahlo’s iconic beauty was, of course, evident from her self-portraits, but it was also captured through the lens of some of the most legendary photographers of the 20th century.

Now, Throckmorton Fine Art’s exhibit “Mirror Mirror…Portrait of Frida Kahlo,” brings together over 50 rare vintage photographs of the legendary artist from photographers such as Héctor García, Gisele Freund, Lola Alvarez Bravo and Nickolas Muray.

Frida Kahlo photographed in 1938 by Nickolas Muray (Photo: Throckmorton Fine Art)

Frida Kahlo photographed in 1938 by Nickolas Muray (Photo: Throckmorton Fine Art)

The exhibit, “Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life,” is open to the public until Sept. 19.

Dr. Salomon Grimberg, an expert on Kahlo’s life and work and the author for the exhibit’s catalog essay, spoke about the self-discovery she found through photographs during a talk at Throckmorton earlier this year.

“As a girl, Frida Kahlo learned how she looked in portraits Guillermo Kahlo, her photographer father, made of her long before she learned about mirrors, which in time became the inseparable companions that provided her with a sense of self,” Mr. Grimberg said in a statement.

The exhibit’s earliest photo shows Kahlo at 18, in 1926, a year after a near-fatal accident that both plagued her for years and greatly shaped her as an artist.

Frida Kahlo at 18 taken by her father Guillermo in 1926. (Photo: Throckmorton Fine Art)

Frida Kahlo at 18 taken by her father in 1926. (Photo: Throckmorton Fine Art)

The exhibit also features Mr. Muray’s colorful portraits, such as Frida On The Rooftop in 1946, Leo Matiz’s 1935 photograph of Kahlo’s and her husband Diego Rivera in Mexico, as well as many anonymous portraits.

“Mirror Mirror…” is also showing rare collections of drawings, letters, memorabilia and photographs that were gifted by Kahlo to Arcady Boytler, the original owner of Kahlo’s self-portrait The Little Deer.