On the Market: De Blasio’s New Horse Carriage Ploy; Industrial Design Hot in Suburbia

Mitchell Hall/flickr.

Mitchell Hall/flickr.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has abandoned his campaign to outlaw horse carriages in Central Park, focusing instead on reducing their number from 220 to just a few dozen and thereby moving their stables from the far West side to Central Park, The New York Times reports. “The plan, described by people familiar with its details, is an unexpected return by Mr. de Blasio to an issue embraced by some of his most generous political contributors, but unpopular among the broader public. A majority of New Yorkers have consistently opposed the mayor’s attempts to remove the horses.”

The New York court State of Appeals will has agreed to consider Related and Sterling Equity’s case for moving forward with the redevelopment of Willet’s Point, Crain’s reports. If the court rules in the developer’s favor, they would be able to re-ignite their plan to build a shopping mall and 23 acres of housing, retail and a hotel, which has been in jeopardy since losing the support of the de Blasio administration.

Speaking of controversial plans: Barry Diller’s Hudson River island park has passed muster with the EPA, Politico New York reports. Of course, that still doesn’t mean it’s popular: “We should be focused on finishing the park that everyone has signed on to for the last 20 years before we start major modifications with what some might call vanity projects,” Tom Fox, who ran the Hudson River Park Trust’s predecessor, told the website.

Meanwhile, a plan to elevate the historic Palace Theater 29 feet has been approved by Landmarks, The Wall Street Journal reports—part of a $2 billion Times Square redevelopment plan.

MoMA has renewed its lease at 81 Spring Street, after looking elsewhere in the hopes of finding a cheaper rent, according to Crain’s. But the decision to stay was less a factor of the landlord dropping the $450 psf asking rent, but of the store concluding that nearby spaces weren’t much cheaper.

So much for edgy industrial design: now the suburbs are embracing exposed ductwork, concrete floors and steel girders, plunking down big money for new-construction that mimics old factories and urban warehouses, The Wall Street Journal reports. Even Toll Brothers “is beginning to offer more commercial, loft-like spaces to meet buyer demand.”

Some potential buyers are backing out of deals on the Upper West Side because of the school district limbo, DNAInfo reports. The city has been considering a plan to redraw the lines for P.S. 199, an overcrowded and highly desirable school, merging it with P.S. 191.

Finally, a woman abandoned her newborn baby in the nativity scene of a Queens church, The New York Times reports. The baby, full-term and healthy, was discovered by a custodian yesterday afternoon. Babies are seeking the mother—although churches are considered safe havens where unwanted infants can be left without fear of prosecution, staff must be alerted.

On the Market: De Blasio’s New Horse Carriage Ploy; Industrial Design Hot in Suburbia