Entertainment Industry Sellouts Line Up to Support Hillary Clinton

Much like the candidate they endorse, Demi Lovato, Katy Perry and Kanye West are byproducts of a system overrun by corporations

A visitor watches a photo of reality television star Kim Kardashian by German photographer Juergen Teller during the opening of the 19th edition of the Paris Photo Fair, the international fina art photography event that hosts leading galleries and artbook dealers, at the Grand Palais in Paris on November 11, 2015. The fair runs through November 12-15. AFP PHOTO/MIGUEL MEDINA==RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION==(Photo credit should read MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/Getty Images)

A visitor watches a photo of reality television star Kim Kardashian by German photographer Juergen Teller during the opening of the 19th edition of the Paris Photo Fair, in Paris on November 11, 2015. Ms. Kardashian and her husband, Kanye West, have endorsed Hillary Clinton. (Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Some of the biggest names in entertainment—those making millions shoving products down the throats of Americans—are lining up to endorse Hillary Clinton for president. Her celebrity supporters parallel Ms. Clinton as a politician, sharing just as many corporate ties as the democratic candidate herself.

Demi Lovato performed at a Clinton campaign event, Kim Kardashian and Kanye West spent the first Republican debate live-tweeting with Ms. Clinton, and in October 2015, Katy Perry took over Ms. Clinton’s Instagram account. Justin Bieber and Ariana Grande’s manager hosted a fundraiser for her last summer, and Lady Gaga, Beyonce ,50 Cent and Will.I.Am have publicly announced their support for Ms. Clinton.

Entertainment today is churned out like fast food as a means for profit rather than artistic development and integrity. Ms. Clinton’s celebrity supporters are nothing more than tools for corporate influence, most likely to be seen or heard in television commercials or saturating the airwaves of local radio as though they were the only artists in existence. They are byproducts of an industry overrun by major corporations.

Kim Kardashian epitomizes the power of corporate media to create a celebrity out of nothing, maintaining her status through mind-numbing reality shows, PR stunts and endless overexposure.

Katy Perry is set to receive millions for appearing in this year’s Super Bowl halftime show, sponsored by Pepsi. Lady Gaga was Stefani Germanotta, an NYU student, until her record label pushed her to dye her hair blonde to shake her natural resemblance to Amy Winehouse. Demi Lovato was bred into a pop music prodigy by Disney. In 2010, Will.I.Am and the Black Eyed Peas were dubbed “the most corporate band in America” by The Wall Street Journal. Kim Kardashian epitomizes the power of corporate media to create a celebrity out of nothing, maintaining her status through mind-numbing reality shows, PR stunts and endless overexposure.

On the flip side, Bernie Sanders’ celebrity endorsements come from comedians, actors and musicians who have gone against the grain. Sarah Silverman and Margaret Cho have both publicly endorsed Mr. Sanders, with Ms. Silverman introducing him at an August 2015 campaign rally in Los Angeles. In the 1990s Ms. Cho walked away from a major network sitcom as corporate influences on the show wanted the her to tone down her ethnicity. On January 26, Ms. Silverman will headline a campaign fundraiser at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles with Kevin Nealon, George Lopez, and Paul Rodriguez.

Ms. Clinton’s supporters seem to do everything for likes, shares and sponsorships.

Musicians with real instrumental talent—like Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys, Jeff Tweedy of Wilco, Neil Young, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jackson Browne, Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth, Greg Dulli of the Afghan Whigs and John Densmore of the Doors—not only support the Vermont Senator, but share the bond of not relying on corporate sponsors for success. These performers actually play their instruments.

Mr. Sanders’ anti-establishment support also includes a list of award-winning actors. The Big Short, portraying investors making millions by anticipating the housing crisis that lead to the 2008 recession, was called a “$28 million campaign ad for Bernie Sanders.” Director Adam McKay is an avid Sanders supporter, and Big Short star Ryan Gosling tweeted a video on his birthday—Mr. Sanders embracing a young Muslim woman—asking his followers to share it. Mark Ruffalo, who has stood up against companies like Monsanto, is a big Bernie Sanders fan as well.

While some of his supporters are mainstream film stars, the issues they embrace and the activism they champion align with Mr. Sanders’ campaign platforms of standing up to corporate greedpolitical corruption and encouraging disenfranchised Americans to get involved in the process of democracy to have their voices heard. This is a far cry from Ms. Clinton’s supporters, who seem to do everything for likes, shares and sponsorships.