Italy Clothes Nude Statues for Iranian Prez, MFA Boston Buys Frida Painting—and More

A visitor walks past marble statues on display at Rome's Capitoline Museum (Musei Capitolini) on Capitol Hill on January 26, 2016. Italy's desire to court visiting Iranian President Hassan Rouhani extended to covering up classical nude sculptures in the Capitoline Museum, where he met Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, it emerged on Tuesday. / AFP / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

Statues on display at Rome’s Capitoline Museum (Musei Capitolini). (Photo: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images)

Italy has covered the nude statues of its Capitoline Museums in preparation for a visit from Iran’s president Hassan Roudhani.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, has acquired its first artwork by Frida Kahlo, a 1928 painting titled Dos Mujeres (Salvadora y Herminia).

Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, was responsible for getting Nic Cage to return his dinosaur skull to Mongolia, but that’s just one of 15 art-related forfeiture cases the prosecutor has overseen.

Pittsburgh’s Mattress Factory Museum now has its very own “Skyspace” thanks to a donation by James Turrell, the artist known for creating the immersive light sculptures that open interior spaces to dramatic views of the sky. The estimated value of the gift is $1 million.

The late collector Dorothy Draude Edinburg left the Art Institute of Chicago $35 million, its largest donation to date. The funds will go toward acquiring works of Asian art.

A long-lost Beatrix Potter story, The Tale of Kitty-In-Boots, will be published by Penguin Random House in September. Potter never had the chance to finish the story with her iconic illustrations; it will be finished with drawings by Quentin Blake, who is known for his work in Roald Dahl’s series of children’s books.