Can You Guess the Famous Artists Behind This Jewelry?

These art stars' have adapted their signature styles for everyday wear

John Baldessari, Crowd Arm (Gold on Silver), 2016.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma, © John Baldessari. Courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery and Hauser & Wirth
Phyllida Barlow, untitled brooch II, 2015.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma, © Phyllida Barlow. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Subodh Gupta, Untitled, 2013.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma , © Subodh Gupta. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Louise Bourgeois, Spiral, 2008 in 22kt Yellow Gold Plated Silver and Spiral, 2008 in Rhodium Plated Silver.
Gorka Postigo, © The Easton Foundation/VAGA.
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Mary Heilmann, Untitled, 2016.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma , © Mary Heilmann. Courtesy the artist, 303 Gallery and Hauser & Wirth
Stefan Brüggemann, Fool’s Gold (Small), 2016.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma , © Stefan Brüggemann. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Andy Hope 1930, Aztek, 2017.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma © Andy Hope. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
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Cristina Iglesias, Arm Piece, 2016, Shoulder Piece, 2016 and Hip Piece, 2016.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma, © Cristina Iglesias. Courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery and Hauser & Wirth
Matthew Day Jackson, Vanitas I, 2013.
Todd-White Art Photography, © Matthew Day Jackson Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Bharti Kher, Warrior Bracelet, 2017.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma, © Bharti Kher. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
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Caro Niederer, Charm Bracelet 1, 2009.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma, © Caro Niederer. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Michele Oka Doner, Nekton, 2016 and Plankton, 2017.
Photograph by Gorka Postigo modeled by Rossy de Palma, Courtesy the artist, Marlborough Gallery and Hauser & Wirth

Artist-designed jewelry is by no means a new fad. Man Ray, Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali all designed wearable works of art in their day. But now a new show at New York’s Hauser & Wirth gallery is passing on the tradition to the next generation of artists, whose creations only truly come to life when worn. The Portable Art Project, organized by Celia Forner, began in 2008 with a commissioned set of gold and silver cuffs designed artist Louise Bourgeois. Now, a total of 15 artists have joined the initiative, designing original pieces of unique jewelry and small editioned series, which will be shown for the first time to the public on April 20.

Of course, Bourgeois’ 2008 cuffs will be on view. The pieces wrap nearly the entire forearm in brushed swirls of yellow and rose gold and rhodium-plated silver. Bourgeois’ desire to marry flesh and metal is echoed in Bharti Kher’s Warrior Bracelet, a golden glove shaped like a lions head. In a release for the show, the artist describes the piece as “a skin the shaman carries.” Where Bourgeois’ golden hoops only envelope the arm, Kher’s bracelet transforms the entire appendage, and possibly the wearer, during use. “Wear it to work and keep it in your bedroom for when you need to call into being your warrior,” says the artist.

John Baldessari, who is known for his colorful appropriations of found photographs, has also designed a set of gold and silver arm cuffs. His Crowd Arm builds on Kher’s body-as-weapon theme, going one step further, with the cuffs covering just the elbow with protruding golden spikes.

Sentimentality is a fundamental part of what makes all jewelry timeless. In Caro Niederer’s charm bracelet, the artist has attached delicately framed painted portraits of moments from her own life. Meanwhile, Subodh Gupta’s necklaces appear to overflow with diamonds and emeralds in the same way a food jar from a home kitchen might spill its contents.

Phyllida Barlow, who will represent Britain at the 2017 Venice Biennale, has garnered international attention for her large-scale structures made from common materials such as wood and plaster. For the Portable Art Project, Barlow has shrunk her larger-than-life creations down considerably, just small enough that they might be attached as a brooch. And Matthew Day Jackson’s memento mori-themed skeletal sculptures are art first, and wearable object second, fashioned with detachable wearable rings.

Works in the Portable Art Project are priced between $15,000 to $120,000, and also feature pieces by Stefan Brüggemann, Mary Heilmann, Andy Hope 1930, Christina Iglesias, Nate Lowman, Paul McCarthy, Michele Oka Doner and Pipilotti Rist.

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