Best New Art Spaces to Visit This Fall

One of the best new places to view art this year? The Magazzino of Italian Art, in upstate New York.
Marco Anelli

Magazzino

Cold Spring, New York

A former warehouse that has been rehabbed into a stunning minimalist museum, nestled in the hills of the Hudson Valley—just a few miles away from Dia Art Foundation—Magazzino just opened its doors to the public in June. Started by collectors Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu, the private institution is dedicated to exhibiting postwar and contemporary Italian art. Largely drawn from their private stash of Arte Provera, expect to find work by artists like Mario and Marisa Merz, Alighiero Boetti and Luciano Fabro.

Marco Anelli

We Buy Gold

Brooklyn

Since opening its roving space in the rapidly gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant this past March, We Buy Gold has quickly made a name for itself as one of the most dynamic art spaces in New York. Started by Joeonna Bellorado-Samuels—who is also director of Chelsea’s Jack Shainman Gallery—and Aryn Drake Lee-Williams, the gallery operates as a project space for artists of color in the Bed-Stuy community. But in July, it played host to secret Solange pop-up performance, proving its reach far beyond Nostrand Avenue.

Courtesy We Buy Gold

Bahamas Biennale

Detroit

An artist-run space, Bahamas Biennale is known for presenting conceptual, new media and installation work by emerging artists. Owner Sean Thomas Blott started the gallery many years ago, as a kind of project space when he was living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After moving to Detroit, he began representing a number of select artists. In May he moved the gallery to a 2,000-square-foot warehouse space in Motor City’s cool East Side neighborhood. Christening the new venue was an exhibition of collaborative works—including a chain-link fence made of incense that was lit on fire by artists Joshua Citarella and Brad Troemel. Slated to open this fall are shows by Chicago-based artist Lauren Taylor and Michigan-born sculptor Patrick Hill.

Courtesy Bahamas Biennale
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Boesky West

Aspen, Colorado

This spring, New York gallerist Marianne Boesky opened this Rocky Mountain outpost of her eponymous Chelsea gallery. Just a few blocks from the Aspen Art Museum, the 3,000-foot space comprises a cabin that was once home to 19th century photographer, James “Horsethief” Kelly. In addition to hosting exhibitions of work by artists already on Boesky’s roster—including Frank Stella, Larry Bell and John Houck—the gallery will soon institute a residency program for historians, curators and writers in the off-season.

Courtesy Boesky West

Marciano Museum

Los Angeles

Brothers Paul and Maurice Marciano, who represent half of the four fraternal founders of Guess Jeans, opened the Marciano Art Foundation this past May. Housed in a beautifully refurbished Masonic temple on Wilshire Boulevard, the spacious galleries showcase a rotating selection from the brothers’ 1,500-piece private art collection along with special exhibitions, like the critically acclaimed inaugural show of work by L.A.-based artist Jim Shaw, on view through January 13, 2018.

Courtesy Marciano Museum

Anastasia Tinari Projects

Chicago

Located in Chicago’s increasingly trendy West Town area, this gallery just opened its doors in September. Started by 30-year-old Anastasia Tinari (who is concurrently the director of one of the Windy City’s most esteemed contemporary art galleries, Rhona Hoffman) the space presents work by emerging and mid-career socio-political artists based in the area, such as Zachary Cahill and Ato Ribeiro.

Courtesy Anastasia Tinari Projects
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Olsen Gruin Gallery

New York

Opened in New York’s Nolita neighborhood in March 2017, this gallery is a collaboration between Tim Olsen, a former Sydney-based gallerist, Emerald Gruin and her partner, Adrian, who were previously involved with Rox Gallery that shuttered its Lower East Side space in 2014. Their roster of artists includes some of Australia’s biggest contemporary exports, including TV Moore, George Byrne and Leila Jeffreys, along with American artists such as KOAK. Their venue is also a platform for contemporary Aboriginal artists to reach U.S. markets, and they recently held a group show organized by Adam Knight, vice president of the Aboriginal Art Association of Australia, featuring 15 artists. The gallery is presenting new works by Sydney-born, L.A.-based photographer George Byrne this fall.

Courtesy Olsen Gruin

Every fall, the art world finds itself with a full calendar of museum exhibitions to see and new galleries to visit, all touted as important or memorable or extraordinary. Sadly, many will blur together in a frenzy of wine and white walls. But we’ve got on our eye on these seven new spaces, all recently opened this year, to see what fresh new perspectives they might bring to the table this season.

Margaret Carrigan is a freelance writer and editor. She planned to go to law school but she did terribly on the LSAT, so she got a master’s in art history instead. She lives in Brooklyn with her cat, who is named after Alyssa Milano’s character from the early aughts CW smash hit series Charmed.

More Fall Arts:

Top 10 Fall Art Exhibitions
Not-to-Miss Fall Art Events
Emerging Art World Power Players
Top 10 Fall Movie Releases
Top 10 TV Shows to Add to Your Queue This Fall
The Art World’s Most Involved Socialites

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