Getty’s 15 Most Powerful Photographs of Hurricane Irma

Tati Roberts of Key West, Florida, retreats from the Higgs Beach pier.
Rob ONeal/Getty Images via Washington Post
A car sits abandoned in storm surge along North Fort Lauderdale Beach Boulevard as Hurricane Irma hits the southern part of the state.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Men clear debris from a roadway the morning after Hurricane Irma swept through Naples, Florida.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Having trouble finding a hotel room, members of the Watson family, of St. Petersburg, wait on the side of the road as they weigh their options on where to go next while attempting to evacuate the area ahead of Hurricane Irma.
Brian Blanco/Getty Images
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Mia Herman has an acquaintance take a photo of her sitting on a fire hydrant on a flooded street as Hurricane Irma hits Miami, Florida.
Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Fallen trees block a parking lot along North Federal Highway 1.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
A woman looks at the weather out the window of a classroom at a shelter within the Pizzo Elementary School in Tampa, Florida.
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
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A home with a religious message taped to the front door sits apparently undamaged just hours after Hurricane Irma passed through Fort Meade, Florida.
Brian Blanco/Getty Images
A truck is seen on its side after being blown over as Hurricane Irma passed through Miami, Florida.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
A man walks through debris caused by Hurricane Irma on Brickell Avenue in Miami, Florida.
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
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Gasoline pumps are wrapped in plastic ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Residents inspect the extreme receding water in Tampa Bay ahead of Hurricane Irma on September 10, 2017.
Brian Blanco/Getty Images
A message reading "You Don't Scare Us Irma" is written on plywood being used to cover the windows of a building as people prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Irma on September 8, 2017 in Miami Beach, Florida.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
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A couple leave their flooded home the morning after Hurricane Irma swept through Fort Myers, Florida.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Partially submerged boats caused by Hurricane Irma sit in the water in a marina in downtown Miami, Florida.
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

On Sunday, September 10, Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida after carving a devastating path through the Caribbean Islands—and only a week after Hurricane Harvey hit Texas and caused widespread damage. With multiple fatalities and entire islands reduced to rubble, Americans anxiously followed the storm’s path to the Sunshine State.

Originally, Irma’s path was set for the east coast of the state, leaving Miami residents with the choice to brace themselves or follow the mandatory evacuation order, which caused nearly standstill traffic on Florida’s north-bound interstates. But, the storm’s path shifted last minute to the Gulf Coast. Cities like Naples and Tampa had to prepare quickly for one of the largest hurricanes they had seen in years.

Some Florida residents evacuated the state, others found refuge in shelters for safety, and some chose to stay in their own homes. Photojournalists were on the scene as the state prepared, and as the storm hit, they captured powerful images of the impact of the natural disaster.

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