It’s never to early to talk about the 2007 State Senate races

A district-by-district look at the forty contests for the New Jersey State Senate to take place in November 2007:It’s never to early to talk about the 2007 State Senate races: District 1: Republican Nicholas Asselta is expected to run for re-election. The only real chance for Democrats to compete for this seat is if Assemblyman Jefferson Van Drew agreed to run. Don’t count on that happening, especially if you believe the two have a gentleman’s agreement in this district. District 2: There is some speculation that Republican William Gormley, perhaps one of the most powerful State Senators in modern times and the de facto head of the Atlantic GOP machine, might retire in 2007. He lost his Judiciary Committee chairmanship after the ’03 election, but his clout in Democratic Trenton is not gone: insiders say Gormley was very much a player in the recent removal of Casino Control Commission Chairwoman Linda Kassekert from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority board. CRDA has long been a key subsidiary of Gormley, Inc., and the veteran Senator may have to battle a new Governor and a block of South Jersey legislators anxious to reduce his power in Atlantic County. If Gormley does run for a ninth term, he’s a clear favorite to win again. If he doesn’t, local Republicans say that one of his longtime allies, Assemblyman Frank Blee, is his likely successor. On paper, the second should be more competitive than it is. Democrats lack a deep farm system in Atlantic County, and while they have threatened to beat Republicans in recent years, they frequently fall short. District 3: Democrat Stephen Sweeney, who ousted 28-year veteran Raymond Zane in 2001, has emerged as the most powerful Democrat in Southwestern New Jersey — the tri-county region of Gloucester, Salem and Cumberland counties that make up the third legislative district. Sweeney, a labor leader and Gloucester County Freeholder Director, says he’ll run for Congress in 2006, if Congressman Rob Andrews runs for the United States Senate. If Sweeney goes to Congress, look for Democrats to send Assemblyman John Burzichelli to the State Senate — assuming that he beats Republican Phil Rhudy in the November Assembly race. The lack of depth to the Southwestern New Jersey GOP bench would make Burzichelli the favorite to hold the seat in 2007. Republicans probably couldn’t convince former Assembly Speaker Jack Collins to give up his lucrative lobbying and business ventures to return to the Legislature, and there is no evidence that ex-Assemblyman Gary Stuhltrager is interested in a return to public office. That leaves the Republicans with potential candidates like Salem County Freeholder Susan Bestwick or Cumberland County Freeholder Jeffrey Trout. If Sweeney doesn’t go to Congress, he’s virtually unbeatable in the next election. District 4: Democrat Frederick Madden won a Senate seat by a mere 66 votes in 2003 against incumbent George Geist, who moved up to the Senate earlier that year after almost twelve years in the Assembly. The former Acting State Police Superintendent, helped (understatement) by the huge warchest of his party, will surely run for re-election and the GOP has no one who can beat him. District 5: There is no sign that Democrat Wayne Bryant, often depicted on this website beside a non-Kosher farm animal, will retire. Life is good for the longtime (since 1982) legislator: he chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee, his law practice is doing well, and his wife enjoys a prosperous career in public service. If Bryant were to leave the Senate, he has no clear heir apparent. Assemblyman Joseph Roberts will likely be Assembly Speaker, thus making his interest in the upper house highly unlikely. Assemblywoman Nilsa Cruz-Perez could move up (Camden hasn’t sent a woman to the Senate since Alene Ammond in 1973), but local Democrats could look at others in their talent bank, like Dana Redd or Francisco “Frank” Moran, both Camden City Councilmembers who co-chair the Democratic municipal organization, or City Councilman Israel Nieves (who is Cruz-Perez’s brother-in-law). Outside of the City of Camden, possible candidates include Somerdale Mayor Gary Passanante and Runnemede Mayor Ginny Betteridge. For Democrats, there would be some internal conflict over the choice between an African American or a Hispanic. District 6: If Democrat John Adler celebrates his 50th birthday in the State Senate, it’s because his achievements hadn’t matched his ambitions. The 46-year-old Adler first went to the Senate in 1991, defeating four-term Republican Lee Laskin in what was possibly the best Republican year since 1920. Adler has found himself somewhat landlocked in his desire to move up: he lives in a Republican congressional district occupied since 1984 by Jim Saxton (whom Adler challenged in 1990). Adler wants to run for the United States Senate in 2008, if Frank Lautenberg — who turns 84 that year — doesn’t run. He formed a federal campaign account in 2003 and has raised over $200,000 — a move that apparently annoyed the incumbent. Most Democrats these days expect that Lautenberg will run again. Expect Adler to run in 2007, unless he finds the road to higher office so unavailable that he seeks a cabinet post in a Corzine administration. If that happens, his obvious replacement is the equally ambitious Assembly Budget Committee Chairman, Louis Greenwald. If Greenwald is unavailable — that happens if Rob Andrews goes to the U.S. Senate and Democrats choose Greenwald over Steve Sweeney for the House seat — look for retiring Camden County Freeholder Jeffrey Nash to angle for the Senate. District 7: Republican Diane Allen wins a Democratic-leaning legislative district rather comfortably, and neither side thinks she can be defeated in 2007. While the three-term Senator is expected to seek re-election, it would not come as a complete shock to her own party if she decided to call it quits. Allen ran for the United States Senate in 2002, finishing a reasonably close second behind a better-financed Douglas Forrester. She spent two years as a likely ’05 gubernatorial candidate, but her campaign never got off the ground –partially because she needed to care for a sick mother, and partially because Burlington GOP powerhouse Glenn Paulsen never became engaged in Allen’s statewide ambitions. Allen is not running for U.S. Senate next year, and is not making career plans based on whether Jim Saxton will retire from Congress anytime soon. If Allen leaves, the 7th district Senate seat would become the most hotly contested contest of the off-year election, and their is no automatic candidate on either side. The Republicans would probably go with Burlington County Sheriff Jean Stanfield, who nearly won an Assembly seat in 2003. Assemblyman Herbert Conaway would clearly like to run for an open Senate seat, but there is a large block of organization Democrats that won’t want him there. Conaway turned down strong requests from his party to challenge Allen in 2001 and 2003, and his race for Congress last year against Saxton was unimpressive. The other Democratic Assemblyman, Jack Conners, is from the smaller Camden County portion of the district. District 8: The conventional wisdom is that Republican Martha Bark is serving her last term. She will be 78-year-old in 2007 and has become embroiled in her own scandal involving high-paying, pension-boosting part-time jobs and serious questions as to how much time she devoted to those ventures. This is a Republican district and almost any GOP candidate other than the incumbent should hold the seat. The question is whether the nomination will go to the senior Assemblyman, Francis Bodine, who will be 71, or to the younger (age is such a relative issue when it pertains to the New Jersey Senate) Assemblyman Larry Chatzidakis, who would be 58. Burlington Republicans historically move people up the ladder — Mayor to Freeholder, Freeholder to Assembly, Assembly to Senate — but it’s been years since the last opening. Several Republican insiders say the Senate seat could go to Burlington GOP Chairman Michael Warner, a retired Army Colonel and ex-Deputy Commissioner of Military and Veterans Affairs, or to the much younger Burlington County Freeholder Dawn Addiego. District 9: Republican Leonard Connors has served in public office since his election to the Surf City Borough Council in 1962. He’s been the Mayor since 1966, and the State Senator from the ninth district since 1981. His age (78 in 2007) makes him a candidate for retirement, though in New Jersey that’s not always an accurate barometer. Frankly, the only one who knows what Connors will do is Connors, and he’s not likely to share his thoughts anytime soon. He can keep the seat as long as he wants, or simply pass it on to his son, Christopher Connors, an Assemblyman since 1989. District 10: Republican Andrew Ciesla won a Senate seat in the very Republican year of 1991, when John Russo, Sr. (the former Senate President and onetime gubernatorial candidate) retired. Ciesla defeated nine-term Democratic Assemblyman John Paul Doyle and has coasted to re-election ever since. Ciesla wins if he seeks a sixth term in 2007. If he retires, Assemblyman James Holzapfel, a former Ocean County Prosecutor and a close ally of GOP County Chairman George Gilmore, would likely go to the Senate. District 11: Republican Joseph Palaia says he won’t run for a seventh term in 2007, when he turns 80. The path of his successor is very much tied to the current race for State Assemby, where GOP incumbents Steve Corodemus and Sean Kean face an aggressive challenge from Democrats Matt Doherty and James Reilly. The politics of the ’07 Senate race has been very much on the minds of Corodemus and Kean, who don’t like each other and who both want to be Senator. If they both win re-election, watch for a real fight for the GOP Senate nomination; if the Democrats win, one of the two — probably Doherty — will run for Senate. Another scenario: each party wins one Assembly seat, setting up a rare Senate race between two incumbent Assemblymen. District 12: Democrat Ellen Karcher upset Co-Senate President John Bennett in 2003 after (with some help) making Bennett’s personal ethics the campaign issue. Reports that as a Marlboro Councilwoman, Karcher wore a wire to help FBI agents in their investigations of local corruption have only strengthened Karcher’s hold on the 12th district seat. Democratic Assemblymen Michael Panter and Robert Morgan ousted GOP incumbents in that same campaign; if they hold their seats this year against challengers Jennifer Beck and Declan O’Scanlon, Karcher’s re-election will look exponentially more secure. Similarly, Republicans are already eyeing the ’05 Assembly race as their chance to win the Senate seat back two years later. District 13: Republican Joseph Kyrillos won the Senate seat in 1991, defeating an appointed Democrat who took over after incumbent Richard Van Wagner left the race in July to take a job at the Sports Authority. He ran for Congress in 1992 (against Frank Pallone), served as Republican State Chairman from 2001 to 2004, and passed up chances to run for Senate Minority Leader (after the 2003 election) and Governor in 2005. The 45-year-old Kyrillos — who has spent his entire adult life in politics — can probably hold the Senate seat for as long as he wants, but a Kyrillos friend says people shouldn’t be shocked if he decides to call it quits. If the GOP holds the two Assembly seats, look for Amy Handlin to move up to the Senate. A Democratic victory would make a Kyrillos retirement much less likely: he’s not about to cede his seat to former Assemblyman Bill Flynn, who has unsuccessfully challenged him three times in sixteen years. District 14: Republican Peter Inverso has survived some fairly tough races in this highly competitive Mercer/Middlesex district: he toppled a seemingly invincible Francis McManimon in 1991 and survived challenges from Sheriff Gilbert Lugossey in 1997, Sheriff Samuel Plumeri in 2001, and former Assemblyman Anthony “Skip” Cimino in 2003. At this point, Inverso would be hard to beat if he runs again in 2007, at age 69 — the question is whether the Democrat most often mentioned for the Senate seat, Hamilton Mayor Glen Gilmore, will pass on a re-election bid that year to challenge Inverso. If Inverso retires, there could be quite a battle for the Democratic Senate nomination between Gilmore and Linda Greenstein, who passed on a Senate run in 2003 and still has to win re-election to the Assembly this fall. The obvious Republican choice to succeed Inverso is Assemblyman Bill Baroni, who, like Greenstein, is fighting to keep his own seat. District 15: Like so many of her colleagues, Democrat Shirley Turner has been mentioned as a possible candidate for a pension-boosting job in the Executive branch — she was rumored to be in line for Commissioner of Human Services in 2004. Conspiracy theorists say that as Governor, Jon Corzine can play Solomon by putting Turner in his cabinet so that Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, the Democratic State Chairwoman, can move up to the Senate. That helps Corzine avoid having to tell Watson Coleman that he can’t help her win a race for Majority Leader against Essex County’s Wilfredo Caraballo — or having to tell Steve Adubato, Sr. that he can. Turner won’t lose a Senate race if she runs, and the Democrats hold this seat no matter who their nominee is. District 16: 72-year-old Republican Walter Kavanaugh went to the Assembly in 1975 and to the Senate in 1997, having waited longer than he had hoped for the venerable John Ewing to finally retire. Kavanaugh insists that he’s running again, even though some obvious health issues have made him much less active in recent years. Short of an unlikely Al D’Amato/Jacob Javits type of primary challenge, Kavanaugh can probably remain in the Senate as long as he wants. If he doesn’t run, GOP Assemblymen Christopher Bateman and Peter Biondi will both want the seat — although they won’t necessarily compete against each other. The one to watch in this race would be Bridgewater Mayor Patricia Flannery, whose solid conservative credentials would make her a huge factor in a contest for the Senate nomination. District 17: Democrat Robert Smith is expected to seek a third term in the Senate and will have no trouble holding his seat. Smith once had higher aspirations — he challenged incumbent Congressman Frank Pallone in the 1992 Democratic primary — but even if Pallone were to run for U.S. Senate next year, Smith is no longer viewed as a contender for that seat. Some Democrats say Smith wants to be state Environmental Protection Commissioner, but it’s hard to imagine Jon Corzine — suddenly anxious to show his independence from party bosses — putting John Lynch’s guy in charge of the DEP. District 18: Democrat Barbara Buono won’t have any trouble winning a third term, but isn’t necessarily on the cusp of a major statewide appointment. She stood with Richard Codey during the brief insider battle for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and with Jon Corzine in the special election convention for Senate in the 37th district. If Frank Pallone goes to the U.S. Senate, Buono could emerge as a very real candidate for Congress — which would put Assemblyman Patrick Diegnan (and not the next Mayor of Edison) next in line for the State Senate. District 19: Democrat Joseph Vitale, the Chairman of the Senate Health Committee, is one of the few incumbents who already has an announced ’07 opponent: Steve Maness, an unemployed Minister from Sayreville, is the nephew of Donald Manes, who was the powerful Queens Borough President when he killed himself with a butcher knife after his 1986 indictment. A Democrat-turned-Republican, Jew-turned-Christian, Maness was the Conservative Party candidate for Middlesex County Freeholder in 1998. Vitale, a serious legislator with higher aspirations, will have no trouble holding his seat. There is some speculation that Democrats might seek to draft Vitale for Mayor in 2007, if incumbent Frank Pelzman doesn’t seek re-election, or as a compromise candidate if State Treasurer John McCormac decides to run. District 20: On election night 2003, Democrat Raymond Lesniak declared to a gathering of Democrats that the seventh Senate term he had just been elected to would be his last. The remark sparked intense interest among the crowd, but one day later he told PoliticsNJ.com that while the comment was in jest, but that it doesn’t mean leaving the Senate isn’t on his mind. Lesniak’s clout won’t be as great in a Corzine administration, and unless Al Gore makes a comeback, he’s no longer on the short list for Ambassador to France — still, Lesniak is predictably unpredictable, so you never know. If he does leave, watch for one heck of an insider fight between Assemblymen Neil Cohen and Joseph Cryan, and possibly Elizabeth Mayor Christian Bollwage. District 21: Republican Thomas Kean, Jr. is running for United States Senator in 2006. If he wins, look for a fight at a January 2007 special election convention between the district’s two Assemblymen, Jon Bramnick and Eric Munoz. If Kean loses his statewide race, he’s a sure-bet for re-election to his current job. District 22: Democrat Nicholas Scutari, the Senator from Gregorio, will have no trouble capturing a second term. He won the seat in 2003 as a late replacement for Joseph Suliga. District 23: Republican Leonard Lance may face a challenge for another term as Senate Minority Leader, but he’s virtually unbeatable in his own legislative district. District 24: There has been no shortage of retirement rumors concerning Republican Robert Littell, whose combination of longevity of service (he was first elected to the Assembly in 1967) and some health issues gives the impression that he’s older than his real age: 69. Littell and his wife, former Republican State Chairwoman Virginia Littell, are anxious to pass the Senate seat on to their daughter, Alison Littell McHose, who won election to the State Assembly in 2003. That strategy doesn’t work for Assemblyman Guy Gregg, who also covets a move to the upper house. Littell survived aggressive primary challenges in 1987 and 1991 from former Sussex County Prosecutor George Daggett, and local GOP leaders say he might face another primary challeneg if he runs again in 2007. District 25: By the next election, it will have been ten years since a Republican challenger defeated an incumbent Democratic State Senator in New Jersey — that was Anthony Bucco, who ousted Gordon MacInnes in 1997 to reclaim a reliably Republican seat lost four years earlier when voters tossed embattled Senate Majority Leader John Dorsey. Bucco won easily in 2001, but had to work hard and spend some money to win his third term when allegations of sexual harassment from a former employee gave him a tough race against his predecessors wife, Blair MacInnes. There had been some talk that Bucco might retire in 2007, or even face a primary, but recent specualtion is that he’s running again. Bucco has spoken with some GOP Senators and party leaders about challenging Leonard Lance for Minority Leader. If Bucco, who served as Co-Majority Leader from 2002 to 2004, were to become Minority Leader, he would almost certainly run again. If the 67-year-old Bucco loses a leadership bid, retirement could be a very real possibility. The Republicans have a deep and wide farm system in the 25th: Assemblymen Michael Patrick Carroll and Richard Merkt would almost certainly consider a Senate bid, as would ’05 gubernatorial candidate John Murphy and his colleague on the Morris County Board of Freeholders, John Inglesino. District 26: Republican Robert Martin announced two weeks ago that he would not seek re-election to the Senate seat he has held since 1993. Dubbed “Mr. Potato Head” by this website during his ’03 primary after altering his ideology to face more conservative GOP primary voters, Martin may have had a tougher time moving back to the right for a second time. The clear front-runner to succeed him is Assemblyman Joseph Pennacchio, who seems to have decided that he will pass up a chance to run for U.S. Senate in 2006 in order to move to the upper house in Trenton. This could happen earlier than 2007, if Martin is able to secure the judgeship or college presidency he has long coveted. District 27: Was Thomas Wolfe right when he said “You can’t go home again?” Will Democrat Richard Codey be happy as a mere State Senator after serving fourteen months as the Governor of New Jersey? Codey’s friends seem to have mixed opinions. There’s a chance the Senate seat Codey has held, easily, since 1981 may open up within the next two years: Codey could find himself in the United States Senate, or at the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority. If that happens, look for his close ally, Assemblyman/West Orange Mayor John McKeon, to succeed him in the Senate. District 28: Democrat Ronald Rice survived his last real primary fight in 1997 with only 53% of the vote. He’s safe this week, but the current fluidity of Newark politics means Rice may have to be on the right side of the ’06 mayoral race to avoid problems with his ’07 re-election. District 29: The 2007 Senate race will be a by-product of the 2006 Newark mayoral race. If Democrat Sharpe James wins a sixth term in his rematch with Cory Booker, he can probably keep the Senate seat if he wants it. But if Booker is the mayor, look for him to secure his own turf by pushing for a new State Senator. Possible candidates: City Councilmen Augusto Amador and Luis Quintana. Both backed James in 2002 and are for Booker in 2006; Quintana, a former Deputy Mayor, challenged James in the 2003 Senate primary, but without success. District 30: Republican Robert Singer, elected after the 1993 death of John Dimon, is expected to run again and will have no trouble winning — as long as he doesn’t hit any speed bumps along the way. District 31: Democrat Joseph Doria had a strange ride between November 2001 and June 2004: an Assemblyman since 1979 (he was Speaker from 1990 to 1992 and Minority Leader for ten years after that) and the Mayor of Bayonne since 1998, he was supposed to become Speaker after the ’01 election before Governor-elect James E. McGreevey engineered his ouster. He ran for a 13th term in 2003, but was defeated in the Democratic primary after finiding himself on the losing side of a State Senate battle between the Hudson County Democratic Organization and Jersey City Mayor Glenn Cunningham. When Cunningham died a year later, Doria easily moved into the Senate seat. Doria wanted to become President of Ramapo College last year, and could conceive ably leave the Senate for a Corzine administration appointment. If he does, look for Assemblyman Louis Manzo to push for the Senate seat. Manzo is on good terms with Mayor Jerramiah Healy and the HCDO leadership these days, but then again, this website hasn’t checked in almost ten minutes. District 32: Democrat Nicholas Sacco, whose real power comes from being Mayor of North Bergen, will run for a fifth term (he won his seat in 1993, ousting incumbent Thomas Cowan in the Democratic primary) and win. District 33: Democrat Bernard Kenny, the Senate Majority Leader and the Hudson County Democratic Chairman, won’t have any trouble holding his Senate seat. Kenny’s real objective is to succeed Richard Codey as Senate President. District 34: Dumped from the organization line in her 2003 re-election bid, Democrat Nia Gill ran against the machine politicians and won a rather decisive victory. She’ll have no problem winning a third term in 2007, if she wants it. Gill is a favorite of Jon Corzine and could wind up in his administration. If that happens, look for Essex County Democrats (possibly with some input from their colleagues in Passaic County) to decide if they want former Democratic State Chairman Thomas Giblin, a certain winner in his ’05 bid for State Assembly, to move up to the Senate, or if they want another African American Senator. District 35: Passaic County Democrats are very fond of their Senator, John Girgenti , who went to Trenton as an Assemblyman in 1977 (he beat GOP incumbent Ronald Fava , who later became Prosecutor and Acting Sheriff), and to the Senate in 1990 when the legendary Frank Graves passed away. The low-key Girgenti shows no signs of slowing down, but he has a Peter Rodino problem: he is a white legislator in a district where Hispanics and African Americans make up the majority of voters. Assemblywoman Nellie Pou briefly mulled a challenge to Girgenti for the 2003 Democratic nomination, and in a Senate where there has only been one Latino member (Bob Menendez from 1992 to 1993), some pundits think it is only a matter of time until the popular Girgenti faces a forced retirement. Possible candidates: Pou, Assemblyman Alfred Steele, and Paterson Mayor Joey Torres. District 36: Democrat Paul Sarlo won an Assembly seat in 2001 and moved up to the Senate in 2003 when Garry Furnari resigned to become a Superior Court Judge. Sarlo won a decisive victory against former nine-term Assemblyman John Kelly, who nearly beat Furnari in the ’01 race. Sarlo seems safe, and this seat won’t be contested again until at least 2008, when a possible U.S. Senate campaign by Congressman Steve Rothman could pave the way for Sarlo to go to Congress. District 37: Democrat Byron Baer ended his 33-year career in the Legislature earlier this month, forcing a nasty convention fight between Bergen County Democratic Chairman Joseph Ferriero and his candidate, former Assemblyman Ken Zisa, and U.S. Senator Jon Corzine and his pick, Assemblywoman Loretta Weinberg. Zisa won by one vote in a race that is headed to the Appellate Division of the state judiciary. At some point, Democrats will have a nominee, who will hold the seat in the November 2005 special, and again in 2007. District 38: Larry Bartels and Donald Scarinci may have broken the Curse of the 38th, where every State Senator elected since the district was created in 1973 (five of them) has ultimately lost re-election. Redistricting made the once-GOP district fairly safe for the Democrats (funny as it seems, adding Fort Lee and Fair Lawn can do that) and Democrat Joseph Coniglio, who won a second term two years ago by a wide margin against a popular GOP Assemblywoman, seems to be in strong shape for the next election. But over the last few days, there has been strong speculation in Democratic circles that Coniglio has interest in leaving the Senate to join the Board of Public Utilities. If he does that (presumably his best shot would be before Dick Codey leaves office), look for another fierce convention fight — possibly between Assemblyman Robert Gordon and Paramus Mayor James Tedesco. District 39: Republican Gerald Cardinale, popular and controversial in his own northeastern corner of Bergen County, has been in the Senate since he ousted a one-term Democrat in 1981. He lost primaries for Governor in 1989 and Congress in 2002, and never rose to a top leadership post, but he still seems happy in the Senate. He could retire in 2007, when he turns 73, although Bergen Republicans expect him to run again. If he doesn’t, the succession is not at all clear: the Cardinale faction of the GOP doesn’t like the two 39th district Assemblymembers, John Rooney (who will be 68 in 2007) and Charlotte Vandervalk (who will be 70). For a while it seemed that former Assemblyman Guy Talarico might be Cardinale’s heir apparent, but his reviews as Bergen County Republican Chairman have made that less likely to happen. District 40: Rumors persist that Republican Hank McNamara wants out of the Senate and into a pension boosting state (or county) job — the latest at the Sports Authority. McNamara has steadfastly denied such speculation (he uses a word loosely defined as male cow manure) and says he isn’t using senatorial courtesy as leverage for a job. McNamara will be 73-years-old a few weeks after the 2007 election and has been in the Senate since 1985 (he ran for Bergen County Executive in 2002). Assemblyman Kevin O’Toole, the Essex County GOP Chairman, had been a virtual Senate candidate since he was redistricted into the 40th district in 2001 — he’s quite anxious to return to the Senate, where he spent eight months as an appointed Senator before watching his seat eliminated in reapportionment. The craziest (and most fun) scenario going around these days is that Paul DiGaetano, who gave up his 36th district seat this year to seek the Republican gubernatorial nomination, will move to Wayne and wait for McNamara to retire. McNamara likes DiGaetano, whom he helped win the ’05 organization line in Bergen, and DiGaetano despises O’Toole, who would not give him the line in Essex.

It’s never to early to talk about the 2007 State Senate races