It’s deja vu all over again

If Richard Codey runs for U.S. Senate next year, he won’t be the first interim statewide officeholder to pass on a bid make his temp job permanent and then turn around and run for another statewide office a year later. David Baird, Jr., a lumber company owner and Camden County Republican leader, was appointed to the United States Senate in November 1929, after Walter Edge resigned to become the Ambassador to France. He declined to run for the seat in 1930 after GOP party leaders settled on millionaire businessman Dwight Morrow, the Ambassador to Mexico (and the father-in-law of aviator Charles Lindbergh) as their candidate. Baird spent thirteen months as a Senator and became popular enough among Republicans to become their gubernatorial candidate in 1931. Baird, whose father had also been an interim Senator, lost to former Governor A. Harry Moore by 230,053 votes — 58%-40%. Footnote: The 58-year-old Morrow’s career as a U.S. Senator was cut short when he died just ten months after taking office.

It’s deja vu all over again