Monday Morning Round-Up

  • Herbert Muschamp turns 2 Columbus Circle into a relic of the forgotten New York of the 60’s and 70’s, when the city used to be gay. (The New York Times)
  • Keeping tan through the winter just got “hella” easier. (Inman News)
  • Americans are fat. Their houses need to fit them. (Alchemic Spot)
  • Do people that are priced out of New York take the bus? (Matrix)
  • Electricity costs rise from 11 cents per kilowatt last April to nearly 20 cents in January. (New York Post)
  • Some like it hot–in bed. Heated blankets are selling out as heating prices climb. (The Wall Street Journal)
  • Yes, a celebrity may just knock on your door too. (The Wall Street Journal)
  • New Yorkers muse over potential citywide improvements, like sidewalk compasses, sealed trash receptacles and alternate-side-of-the street rules for double-parking. (The New York Times)
  • The Architectural Review’s international competition for emerging architecture has 20 entrants from New York. (The Architectural Review)
  • New Yorkers fall in love, adopt neighborhood park. (The New York Times)
  • Maureen Dowd smiles as women gain equality, and sneaking into the men’s bathroom becomes unnecessary. (New York Post)
  • Perhaps it’s best to simply befriend that pesky rodent climbing in your cupboard. (CNN)
  • The newspaper continues to tout the Williamsburg-ification of Philadelphia. (The New York Times)
  • Cheap real estate and cheaper transportation. (The New York Times)
  • Now that the stench of fish has faded, brokers and developers smell opportunity at the Seaport. (Daily News)
  • The forgotten borough becomes a real contender. (The Real Deal)
  • Developers and designers are responsible for nearly half of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions annually. (Metropolis)
  • The New Seven Wonders Foundation is creating a semi-modern list of architectural feats “to alert the world to the destruction of the world’s cultural heritage.” Eh, The Related Companies, LP will surely find a way to get mentioned. (BBC News)
  • Why pay a premium, homeowners might ask, especially if they plan to move in less than seven years? A hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage is not as risky as you may think. (MarketWatch)
  • Craig Newmark, “Exploder of Journalism” and Craigslist founder–the site where apartment hunters scour for a rental bargain among half a million listings each month in just New York–talks. “I’m a guy who may or may not exist.” (New York)
  • Priced out Brooklynites may flee to Manhattan. Corcoran Group reports that the average price of a townhouse in Park Slope reached $3.35 million in 2005, a 90 percent increase over the last quarter of 2004. (New York)
  • Jade Jagger prefers plastic candelabras to brass. (New York)
  • The owners of Blue Water Grill and DavidBurke & Donatella are impregnating cows. They invested in a lovely 2,500-pound Black Angus bull, whose goods will inseminate hundreds of females for the tastiest of young meat. (New York)
  • A new business improvement district, Flatiron 23rd St. Partnership, covers roughly the blocks between Lexington and Sixth Avenues, from 21st to 28th Streets. (The Villager)
  • – Riva Froymovich

    Monday Morning Round-Up