The Class of 2005

Eleven new members of the New Jersey General Assembly will take their seats today: Democrat Nelson Albano, an advocate for tougher drunk driving laws, who defeated Republican Assemblyman Jack Gibson in the first district. Republican Jennifer Beck, a Red Bank Councilwoman, who unseated Democratic Assemblyman Robert Morgan in the 12th district. Democrat Charles Epps, the Jersey City Superintendent of Schools, who defeated Anthony Chiappone in the 31st district Democratic primary. Democrat Thomas Giblin, a former Democratic State Chairman, succeeds Peter Eagler, who did not run for re-election in District 34. Republican Amy Handlin, a Monmouth County Freeholder, who defeated Joseph Azzolina in the Republican primary in District 13. Democrat Valerie Vainieri Huttle, a Bergen County Freeholder, replaces Democrat Loretta Weinberg, now a State Senator, in the 37th district. Republican Marcia Karrow, a Hunterdon County Freeholder, takes the seat of Connie Myers, a Republican Assemblywoman who did not seek re-election in the 23rd district. Democrat Pamela Rosen Lampitt, a Cherry Hill Councilwoman, succeeds sixth district Assemblywoman Mary Previte, a Democrat who did not run again. Democrat Paul Moriarty, the Mayor of Washington Township and a former Philadelphia TV consumer affairs reporter, takes the fourth district seat of Democrat Robert Smith, who did not seek re-election. Democrat Gary Schaer, the Passaic City Council President, replaces 36th district Assemblyman Paul DiGaetano, who sought the Republican nomination for Governor. Democrat James Whelan, a former Mayor of Atlantic City, who defeated Republican Assemblyman Kirk Conover in the second district. A twelfth freshman, Democrat Oadline Truitt, will take the oath of office after the results of her Special Election Convention are certified. Truitt, a longtime Democratic leader in Newark’s South Ward, will take the 28th district seat of Democrat Evelyn Wiliams, who resigned after just a month in office after a series of scandals. Williams had won a November 2005 special election convention to replace the late Donald Tucker.

The Class of 2005