Wednesday, January 16th

Hill and Bill cry and pry their way into a squeaker victory in New Hampshire. (Who cares if the blogosphere is crackling with questions about those curious voting machine vs. paper ballot discrepancies!) Well, at least Hillary’s obscene dramatization of human emotion has had a happy effect on our familial relations, forcing us to agree with dear ol’ tax-allergic, war-veteran dad on a matter of politics for the first time this century: McCain ain’t lookin’ so bad! Meanwhile, January marches on as we barrel toward the Most Depressing Day of the Year (the 24th!) attempting to both eat nothing and spend nothing, even Indian Summers providing little reprieve, inspiring as they do a wave of talk about the grim fate of the polar bear. (Which just got grimmer, as the government failed to list them as endangered last week, thereby sentencing them to extinction by 2050. Get ready for the Marc Jacobs polar bear clutch!) At least someone still cares about justice: Jews, Christians, Muslims and Buddhistsoh my!—honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Museum of Jewish Heritage with an “interfaith discussion.” Hillary parachutes in from the Hill-a-Copter, declares she’s actually a member of all four faiths and that “I was misquoted! What I actually said was, `Lyndon Johnson was a c*cksucker!’” Meanwhile, Maggie Gyllenhaal re-ups her boho credentials by joining writers Zadie Smith, certified genius George Saunders and Vendela Vida (better half of Dave “Leggo My” Eggers, whose Brooklyn lit-charity, 826NYC, the evening benefits) for a reading from The Book of Other People, a short-story collection edited by Ms. Smith. And then, just like a dying sun, January’s intellectual vigor starts to immediately erode as the countdown to Fashion Week begins (yes, again; it feels practically bimonthly these days), as Tim Gunn starts to host things again: First, the Gala Opening for the 2008 American Antiques Show (sounds like something we’ll definitely want to attend in 30 years!), which benefits the American Folk Art Museum, whose consulting curator, Elizabeth Warren, explained to us that folk art is “work by self-taught artists or artists not trained in the academy. It can range from the functional work—weather vanes and quilts—to the more decorative paintings and hooked rugs, samplers. … It’s a really wide-ranging field. There’s also painted furniture, pottery, trade signs, shaker material, toys, maps; decoys are a big one.” Then get back in your crocodile heels, sister girlfriends, because Chanel celebrates its own jewelry line with some kind of understated fete at the Plaza, which is nearing the end of its renovations, and the party is based on Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball (without all those witty smart people). Best not to get into this except to say that Selma Blair, Padma Lakshmi, Eva Amurri (that’s Susan Sarandon Jr.), Christy Turlington and Ed Burns will materialize—pop!—for the photo op.

[Dr. Martin Luther King panel, Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Place, 6:30 p.m., www.mjhnyc.org; The Book of Other People reading, Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, 8 p.m., 212-864-5400; American Antiques Show Gala, Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street, 5 p.m.; Chanel Nuits de Diamants, Plaza’s Grand Ballroom]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Wednesday, January 16th