Haute Cuisine … Off (Yes!) Columbus

The fish dishes, on the other hand, are Mr. Fraser’s strong suit. In particular, he combines citrus fruit with seafood in clever ways: Oranges brighten a plate of skate and shredded chicken wings with chickpea purée. Tiny pieces of grapefruit add a citrusy note to seared Maine sea scallops, accompanied by a neat pile of fennel cut into batons, afloat on a hollandaise sauce. And braised striped bass, served on polenta with a sauce made of cippollini, peanuts and bacon, gets a nice kick of lime.

Dovetail’s wine list is interesting, well chosen and expensive. Read it from right to left. Still, the sommelier is extremely helpful about choosing cheaper vintages, and she cheerfully returned a corked bottle; on another night, she replaced one that was too sweet. The restaurant also offers a choice of 25 sherries served, if you like, with a tasting menu designed to complement them.

The desserts, by pastry chef Vera Tong, who worked at Compass with Mr. Fraser, include a delectable Meyer lemon tart with almonds, a feathery hazelnut strudel filled with melting dark chocolate, and a brioche bread pudding made with banana, bacon brittle and rum vanilla ice cream. The bacon brittle was a daring touch that made me think of the British chef and molecular gastronomist Heston Blumenthal’s controversial egg and bacon ice cream.

Our favorite dessert was a chocolate and caramel fondant. “It tastes like a fabulous Mars Bar served on Lyle’s Golden Syrup!” exclaimed the Scotsman. He’d recently made Blumenthal’s recipe for treacle tart, which calls for baking 12 unopened cans of golden syrup in an oven for 100 hours. Compared with that, recreating Tong’s chocolate caramel fondant at home should be a breeze.

Haute Cuisine … Off (Yes!) Columbus