Rasmussen: Obama lead over McCain down to 5% in New Jersey poll

Sen. John McCain's lead over Sen. Barack Obama is down to 5% in New Jersey, according to a Rasmussen Reports

Sen. John McCain's lead over Sen. Barack Obama is down to 5% in New Jersey, according to a Rasmussen Reports poll issued this evening.

The telephone survey of New Jersey voters, taken Monday night, shows Obama ahead of Republican candidate John McCain 44% to 39%.

Just last month, Obama, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, held a 48% to 39% lead over his GOP rival.

Eleven percent of voters describe themselves as undecided, up from 6% in early June, according to the poll. Five percent (5%) favor some other candidate.

"If leaners are included, Obama leads McCain by an even narrower 47% to 44%," Rasmussen states. "Leaners initially indicate no preference for either major candidate but indicate that they are leaning towards either McCain or Obama.

"Nationally, Obama continues to hold a modest lead over McCain in the Rasmussen Reports daily presidential tracking poll."

Despitethe Democratic candidate's loss of ground, Rasmussen still gives Obama an 87% chance of winning New Jersey's 15 electoral votes.

Key demographic findings of the poll show that women continue to supportObama (52%) far more than his Republican opponent (28%).

"Fifty-three percent (53%) of female voters voiced support for Obama a month ago, but McCain has fallen significantly from 34%," Rasmussen reports."Those voters have moved into the undecided column."

Men, conversely,have shifted towardMcCain.

"Now 54% of male voters back McCain, up from 46% in early June, while 34% favor Obama, an eight percentage point decline from a month ago," the poll states."Only 6% of men are undecided as opposed to 15% of women.

"While both McCain and Obama have locked up more than 70% of the voters in their respective parties, unaffiliated voters prefer the Republican candidate to his Democratic opponent 47% to 33%." Rasmussen: Obama lead over McCain down to 5% in New Jersey poll